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Atopic dermatitis is associated with anxiety, depression, and suicidal ideation, but not with psychiatric hospitalization or suicide

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  • J P Thyssen
  • Carsten R Hamann
  • A Linneberg
  • T M Dantoft
  • L Skov
  • G H Gislason
  • Jashin J Wu
  • A Egeberg
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BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD) has been linked with psychiatric disease in adults. However, the exact relationship and its consequences have been insufficiently studied. Our aim of this study was to assess the association between depression, anxiety, and AD in adults and examine the risk of hospitalization and suicide.

METHODS: We utilized questionnaire data from a large general population study with data on social habits and psychiatric symptoms to compare prevalences of depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation, and anxiety attacks, in adults with and without a history of AD. Additionally, we used nationwide hospital/clinic registry and prescription data to examine the risk of anxiety and depression in Danish adults with mild and moderate-severe AD, as well as the risk of hospitalization and suicide.

RESULTS: In the general population study, those with AD reported clinician-diagnosed depression and anxiety more often than non-AD subjects, and had an increased prevalence of suicidal ideation and depressive symptoms. In the health registry study, moderate-severe AD patients had increased risk of antidepressant and anxiolytic medication use, while patients with mild AD only had increased risk of anxiolytic medication use. There was no increased risk of hospitalization or outpatient contacts due to depression or anxiety, or risk of suicide in AD patients.

CONCLUSIONS: Depression, anxiety, and suicidal ideation are more common among AD individuals, but do not lead to psychiatric consultations, hospitalization, or suicide.

Original languageEnglish
JournalAllergy
Volume73
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)214-220
ISSN0105-4538
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 51732004