Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Associations between male reproductive health and exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Intrauterine exposure to drugs and reproduction—still reasons for concern!

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Brain tumours in children and adolescents may affect the circadian rhythm and quality of life

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Pubarche and Gonadarche Onset and Progression Are Differently Associated With Birth Weight and Infancy Growth Patterns

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Associations between exposure to perfluoroalkyl substances and body fat evaluated by DXA and MRI in 109 adolescent boys

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Prenatal paraben exposure and anogenital distance and reproductive hormones during mini-puberty: A study from the Odense Child Cohort

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

The incidence of many male reproductive disorders, including cryptorchidism and testicular cancer has increased. Semen quality in several countries has declined. Exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) — both prenatal and postnatal — has been proposed to have a role in these trends based on experimental data and animal studies. There is epidemiological evidence for an association between prenatal exposure to EDCs and cryptorchidism, hypospadias, and decreased anogenital distance, as well as an association between an exposure to EDCs in adulthood and semen quality. However, some of these findings are inconsistent across studies. There is less evidence about the role of prenatal exposure to EDCs for semen quality, and only few studies have investigated the role of prenatal EDC exposure in testicular cancer occurrence. This is due to a lack of long-term follow-up studies linking prenatal exposures with male reproductive disorders in adulthood. More research is needed investigating the role of EDC exposure for male reproductive health, particularly long-term follow-up studies to assess the outcomes in adulthood.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCurrent Opinion in Endocrine and Metabolic Research
Volume7
Pages (from-to)49-61
Number of pages13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

    Research areas

  • Anogenital distance, Cryptorchidism, Environment, Hypospadias, Sperm, Testis cancer

ID: 59451920