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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis is not predicted by hypertriglyceridemia or pancreatic enzyme levels in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

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DOI

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  5. Insulin-dependent diabetes: A chronic complication to acute pancreatitis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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BACKGROUND: l-Asparaginase is an important drug for treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), but is associated with serious toxicities, including pancreatitis and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG). Asparaginase-associated pancreatitis (AAP) is a common reason for stopping asparaginase treatment. The aim of this study was to explore if HTG or early elevations in pancreatic enzymes were associated with the subsequent development of AAP.

METHOD: Children (1.0-17.9 years) diagnosed with ALL, treated with asparaginase for 30 weeks, according to the NOPHO ALL2008 protocol at the University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, were eligible. Pancreatic enzymes, triglycerides, and cholesterol were measured regularly.

RESULTS: Thirty-one patients were included. Seven patients were diagnosed with AAP. HTG was most evident when PEG-asparaginase and dexamethasone were administered concomitantly. Overall, there was no significant difference in triglyceride levels in patients who experienced AAP and patients who did not. An increase in triglyceride levels during concomitant dexamethasone therapy in delayed intensification was significantly associated with an increase in pancreas-specific amylase levels two weeks later (P = 0.005).

CONCLUSIONS: AAP does not seem to be associated with HTG. Continuous monitoring of pancreas enzymes does not predict AAP.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPediatric Blood and Cancer
Volume64
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)32-38
Number of pages7
ISSN1545-5009
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017

ID: 49880122