Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Acquired cryptorchidism is frequent in infancy and childhood

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Association between chemical pattern in breast milk and congenital cryptorchidism: modelling of complex human exposures

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Associations between congenital cryptorchidism in newborn boys and levels of dioxins and PCBs in placenta

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Cumulative risk assessment of phthalate exposure of Danish children and adolescents using the hazard index approach

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Early breast development in girls after prenatal exposure to non-persistent pesticides

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Risk of Testicular Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  2. Brain tumours in children and adolescents may affect the circadian rhythm and quality of life

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Brain tumours result in sleep disorders in children and adolescents

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Paracetamol use during pregnancy - a call for precautionary action

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Accurate prevalence data for acquired cryptorchidism are currently sparse and systematic prospective studies have not yet been reported. Our aim was to determine the prevalence of testicular ascent in childhood. In a prospective longitudinal population-based child cohort from Copenhagen, Denmark (1997-2007), testicular position was examined according to a standardised protocol in a total of 1072 boys, at birth (n = 1051), at 3 months (n = 983), 18 months (n = 888), 36 months (n = 790) and again once between 4 1/2 and 10 years of age (n = 509). Ascensus testis was defined as ascent of the testis into a cryptorchid position after normal scrotal position at birth. A congenital cryptorchid testis with spontaneous postnatal descent followed by recurrence of cryptorchidism was named recurrent cryptorchidism. Ascensus testis occurred in 0.2%, 0.6% and 0.6% of boys at 3, 18 and 36 months of age respectively. When including recurrent cryptorchidism the prevalence was 0.2%, 1.2% and 0.8% respectively. Ascensus testis accounts for 58% of all cases of cryptorchidism (congenital and acquired) at 18 months, 71% at 36 months and thereafter 69%. Ascensus testis accounts for more than half of cryptorchid testes seen in childhood and occurs in both previously scrotal and cryptorchid testes. We therefore recommend that all boys should have testis position checked regularly during childhood, at least up to 3 years of age.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Andrology
Volume32
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)423-8
Number of pages6
ISSN0105-6263
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2009

    Research areas

  • Age Factors, Child, Child, Preschool, Cryptorchidism, Denmark, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mass Screening, Population Surveillance, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Recurrence

ID: 44943479