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Rigshospitalet - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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A person-centered intervention targeting the psychosocial needs of gynecological cancer survivors: a randomized clinical trial

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PURPOSE: We investigated the effect of a person-centered intervention consisting of two to four nurse-led conversations using guided self-determination tailored to gynecologic cancer (GSD-GYN-C) on gynecological cancer survivors' quality of life (QOL), impact of cancer, distress, anxiety, depression, self-esteem, and self-reported ability to monitor and respond to symptoms of recurrence.

METHODS: We randomly assigned 165 gynecological cancer survivors to usual care (UC) plus GSD-GYN-C or UC alone. Self-reported QOL-cancer survivor (QOL-CS) total score and subscale scores on physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being were assessed before randomization and at 3 and 9 months after randomization using t tests. Bonferroni and Pipper corrections were applied for multiple testing adjustments.

RESULTS: At 9 months, the GSD-GYN-C plus UC group scored significantly higher on the QOL-CS total scale (P = 0.02) and on the QOL-CS physical well-being subscale (P = 0.01), compared to women receiving UC alone. After adjusting for baseline scores, only the difference in the physical well-being subscale was statistically significant. No other measured outcomes differed between the intervention and control groups after baseline adjustment.

CONCLUSION: We observed higher physical well-being 9 months after randomization in the GSD-GYN-C group, as compared to women receiving usual care.

IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS: The results suggest that the person-centered intervention GSD-GYN-C may improve physical well-being in gynecological cancer survivors. However, further testing is needed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of cancer survivorship : research and practice
Volume10
Issue number5
Pages (from-to)832-41
ISSN1932-2259
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Feb 2016

ID: 46292695