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A low-gluten diet induces changes in the intestinal microbiome of healthy Danish adults

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  • Lea B S Hansen
  • Henrik M Roager
  • Nadja B Søndertoft
  • Rikke J Gøbel
  • Mette Kristensen
  • Mireia Vallès-Colomer
  • Sara Vieira-Silva
  • Sabine Ibrügger
  • Mads V Lind
  • Rasmus B Mærkedahl
  • Martin I Bahl
  • Mia L Madsen
  • Jesper Havelund
  • Gwen Falony
  • Inge Tetens
  • Trine Nielsen
  • Kristine H Allin
  • Henrik L Frandsen
  • Bolette Hartmann
  • Jens Juul Holst
  • Morten H Sparholt
  • Jesper Holck
  • Andreas Blennow
  • Janne Marie Moll
  • Anne S Meyer
  • Camilla Hoppe
  • Jørgen H Poulsen
  • Vera Carvalho
  • Domenico Sagnelli
  • Marlene D Dalgaard
  • Anders F Christensen
  • Magnus Christian Lydolph
  • Alastair B Ross
  • Silas Villas-Bôas
  • Susanne Brix
  • Thomas Sicheritz-Pontén
  • Karsten Buschard
  • Allan Linneberg
  • Jüri J Rumessen
  • Claus T Ekstrøm
  • Christian Ritz
  • Karsten Kristiansen
  • H Bjørn Nielsen
  • Henrik Vestergaard
  • Nils J Færgeman
  • Jeroen Raes
  • Hanne Frøkiær
  • Torben Hansen
  • Lotte Lauritzen
  • Ramneek Gupta
  • Tine Rask Licht
  • Oluf Pedersen
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Adherence to a low-gluten diet has become increasingly common in parts of the general population. However, the effects of reducing gluten-rich food items including wheat, barley and rye cereals in healthy adults are unclear. Here, we undertook a randomised, controlled, cross-over trial involving 60 middle-aged Danish adults without known disorders with two 8-week interventions comparing a low-gluten diet (2 g gluten per day) and a high-gluten diet (18 g gluten per day), separated by a washout period of at least six weeks with habitual diet (12 g gluten per day). We find that, in comparison with a high-gluten diet, a low-gluten diet induces moderate changes in the intestinal microbiome, reduces fasting and postprandial hydrogen exhalation, and leads to improvements in self-reported bloating. These observations suggest that most of the effects of a low-gluten diet in non-coeliac adults may be driven by qualitative changes in dietary fibres.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNature Communications
Volume9
Issue number4630
Pages (from-to)4630
ISSN2041-1723
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Nov 2018

ID: 55630181