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The role of body mass index in incidence and persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection

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Urbute, Aivara ; Thomsen, Louise T ; Belmonte, Federica ; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler ; Frederiksen, Kirsten ; Kjaer, Susanne K. / The role of body mass index in incidence and persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection. I: Annals of Epidemiology. 2020 ; Bind 49. s. 36-41.

Bibtex

@article{16f17cbbd4ba466fa637a1014d5442a0,
title = "The role of body mass index in incidence and persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection",
abstract = "PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the association between body mass index and incident or persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection.METHODS: This cohort study included 6809 women from the general Danish population who participated in two clinical visits (in 1991-1993 and in 1993-1995). Height and weight were measured by nurses, lifestyle data were obtained by structured interviews, and cervical cytology samples were obtained for hrHPV DNA testing. We conducted log-binomial regression to estimate risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident and type-specific persistent hrHPV infection according to body mass index, adjusting for age, education, smoking, and the number of sexual partners in the past year.RESULTS: We found no increased risk of incident hrHPV infection in women who were underweight (RRadjusted, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.64-1.48), overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.82-1.17), or obese (RRadjusted, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.63-1.36) compared with women of normal weight. The risk of hrHPV persistence was similar in overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.71-1.34) and obese (RRadjusted, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.56-1.79) women compared with women of normal weight, whereas underweight women had a lower risk (RRadjusted, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.95).CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity were not associated with HPV incidence or persistence when adjusting for sexual behavior.",
keywords = "Adult, Body Mass Index, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/diagnosis, Cervix Uteri/virology, Cohort Studies, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Incidence, Mass Screening, Obesity/epidemiology, Overweight/complications, Papillomaviridae/genetics, Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis, Population Surveillance, Thinness/epidemiology, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis",
author = "Aivara Urbute and Thomsen, {Louise T} and Federica Belmonte and Kesmodel, {Ulrik Schi{\o}ler} and Kirsten Frederiksen and Kjaer, {Susanne K}",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.07.011",
language = "English",
volume = "49",
pages = "36--41",
journal = "Annals of Epidemiology",
issn = "1047-2797",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of body mass index in incidence and persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection

AU - Urbute, Aivara

AU - Thomsen, Louise T

AU - Belmonte, Federica

AU - Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

AU - Frederiksen, Kirsten

AU - Kjaer, Susanne K

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/9

Y1 - 2020/9

N2 - PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the association between body mass index and incident or persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection.METHODS: This cohort study included 6809 women from the general Danish population who participated in two clinical visits (in 1991-1993 and in 1993-1995). Height and weight were measured by nurses, lifestyle data were obtained by structured interviews, and cervical cytology samples were obtained for hrHPV DNA testing. We conducted log-binomial regression to estimate risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident and type-specific persistent hrHPV infection according to body mass index, adjusting for age, education, smoking, and the number of sexual partners in the past year.RESULTS: We found no increased risk of incident hrHPV infection in women who were underweight (RRadjusted, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.64-1.48), overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.82-1.17), or obese (RRadjusted, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.63-1.36) compared with women of normal weight. The risk of hrHPV persistence was similar in overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.71-1.34) and obese (RRadjusted, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.56-1.79) women compared with women of normal weight, whereas underweight women had a lower risk (RRadjusted, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.95).CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity were not associated with HPV incidence or persistence when adjusting for sexual behavior.

AB - PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the association between body mass index and incident or persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) infection.METHODS: This cohort study included 6809 women from the general Danish population who participated in two clinical visits (in 1991-1993 and in 1993-1995). Height and weight were measured by nurses, lifestyle data were obtained by structured interviews, and cervical cytology samples were obtained for hrHPV DNA testing. We conducted log-binomial regression to estimate risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of incident and type-specific persistent hrHPV infection according to body mass index, adjusting for age, education, smoking, and the number of sexual partners in the past year.RESULTS: We found no increased risk of incident hrHPV infection in women who were underweight (RRadjusted, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.64-1.48), overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98, 95% CI, 0.82-1.17), or obese (RRadjusted, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.63-1.36) compared with women of normal weight. The risk of hrHPV persistence was similar in overweight (RRadjusted, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.71-1.34) and obese (RRadjusted, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.56-1.79) women compared with women of normal weight, whereas underweight women had a lower risk (RRadjusted, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.11-0.95).CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obesity were not associated with HPV incidence or persistence when adjusting for sexual behavior.

KW - Adult

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/diagnosis

KW - Cervix Uteri/virology

KW - Cohort Studies

KW - Denmark/epidemiology

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Incidence

KW - Mass Screening

KW - Obesity/epidemiology

KW - Overweight/complications

KW - Papillomaviridae/genetics

KW - Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis

KW - Population Surveillance

KW - Thinness/epidemiology

KW - Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis

U2 - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.07.011

DO - 10.1016/j.annepidem.2020.07.011

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32711054

VL - 49

SP - 36

EP - 41

JO - Annals of Epidemiology

JF - Annals of Epidemiology

SN - 1047-2797

ER -

ID: 61555902