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Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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The effect of self-directed virtual reality simulation on dissection training performance in mastoidectomy

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

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OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To establish the effect of self-directed virtual reality (VR) simulation training on cadaveric dissection training performance in mastoidectomy and the transferability of skills acquired in VR simulation training to the cadaveric dissection training setting.

STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study.

METHODS: Two cohorts of 20 novice otorhinolaryngology residents received either self-directed VR simulation training before cadaveric dissection training or vice versa. Cadaveric and VR simulation performances were assessed using final-product analysis with three blinded expert raters.

RESULTS: The group receiving VR simulation training before cadaveric dissection had a mean final-product score of 14.9 (95 % confidence interval [CI] [12.9-16.9]) compared with 9.8 (95% CI [8.4-11.1]) in the group not receiving VR simulation training before cadaveric dissection. This 52% increase in performance was statistically significantly (P < 0.0001). A single dissection mastoidectomy did not increase VR simulation performance (P = 0.22).

CONCLUSIONS: Two hours of self-directed VR simulation training was effective in increasing cadaveric dissection mastoidectomy performance and suggests that mastoidectomy skills are transferable from VR simulation to the traditional dissection setting. Virtual reality simulation training can therefore be employed to optimize training, and can spare the use of donated material and instructional resources for more advanced training after basic competencies have been acquired in the VR simulation environment.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: NA. Laryngoscope, 2015.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftThe Laryngoscope
Vol/bind126
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)1883-8
ISSN0023-852X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 9 okt. 2016

ID: 45745973