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The effect of distributed virtual reality simulation training on cognitive load during subsequent dissection training

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@article{17b9563f310d4d959279690b3dd22d72,
title = "The effect of distributed virtual reality simulation training on cognitive load during subsequent dissection training",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Complex tasks such as surgical procedures can induce excessive cognitive load (CL), which can have a negative effect on learning, especially for novices.AIM: To investigate if repeated and distributed virtual reality (VR) simulation practice induces a lower CL and higher performance in subsequent cadaveric dissection training.METHODS: In a prospective, controlled cohort study, 37 residents in otorhinolaryngology received VR simulation training either as additional distributed practice prior to course participation (intervention) (9 participants) or as standard practice during the course (control) (28 participants). Cognitive load was estimated as the relative change in secondary-task reaction time during VR simulation and cadaveric procedures.RESULTS: Structured distributed VR simulation practice resulted in lower mean reaction times (32{\%} vs. 47{\%} for the intervention and control group, respectively, p < 0.01) as well as a superior final-product performance during subsequent cadaveric dissection training.CONCLUSIONS: Repeated and distributed VR simulation causes a lower CL to be induced when the learning situation is increased in complexity. A suggested mechanism is the formation of mental schemas and reduction of the intrinsic CL. This has potential implications for surgical skills training and suggests that structured, distributed training be systematically implemented in surgical training curricula.",
author = "Andersen, {Steven Arild Wuyts} and Lars Konge and S{\o}rensen, {Mads S{\o}lvsten}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1080/0142159X.2018.1465182",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "684--689",
journal = "Medical Teacher",
issn = "0142-159X",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of distributed virtual reality simulation training on cognitive load during subsequent dissection training

AU - Andersen, Steven Arild Wuyts

AU - Konge, Lars

AU - Sørensen, Mads Sølvsten

PY - 2018/7

Y1 - 2018/7

N2 - BACKGROUND: Complex tasks such as surgical procedures can induce excessive cognitive load (CL), which can have a negative effect on learning, especially for novices.AIM: To investigate if repeated and distributed virtual reality (VR) simulation practice induces a lower CL and higher performance in subsequent cadaveric dissection training.METHODS: In a prospective, controlled cohort study, 37 residents in otorhinolaryngology received VR simulation training either as additional distributed practice prior to course participation (intervention) (9 participants) or as standard practice during the course (control) (28 participants). Cognitive load was estimated as the relative change in secondary-task reaction time during VR simulation and cadaveric procedures.RESULTS: Structured distributed VR simulation practice resulted in lower mean reaction times (32% vs. 47% for the intervention and control group, respectively, p < 0.01) as well as a superior final-product performance during subsequent cadaveric dissection training.CONCLUSIONS: Repeated and distributed VR simulation causes a lower CL to be induced when the learning situation is increased in complexity. A suggested mechanism is the formation of mental schemas and reduction of the intrinsic CL. This has potential implications for surgical skills training and suggests that structured, distributed training be systematically implemented in surgical training curricula.

AB - BACKGROUND: Complex tasks such as surgical procedures can induce excessive cognitive load (CL), which can have a negative effect on learning, especially for novices.AIM: To investigate if repeated and distributed virtual reality (VR) simulation practice induces a lower CL and higher performance in subsequent cadaveric dissection training.METHODS: In a prospective, controlled cohort study, 37 residents in otorhinolaryngology received VR simulation training either as additional distributed practice prior to course participation (intervention) (9 participants) or as standard practice during the course (control) (28 participants). Cognitive load was estimated as the relative change in secondary-task reaction time during VR simulation and cadaveric procedures.RESULTS: Structured distributed VR simulation practice resulted in lower mean reaction times (32% vs. 47% for the intervention and control group, respectively, p < 0.01) as well as a superior final-product performance during subsequent cadaveric dissection training.CONCLUSIONS: Repeated and distributed VR simulation causes a lower CL to be induced when the learning situation is increased in complexity. A suggested mechanism is the formation of mental schemas and reduction of the intrinsic CL. This has potential implications for surgical skills training and suggests that structured, distributed training be systematically implemented in surgical training curricula.

U2 - 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1465182

DO - 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1465182

M3 - Journal article

VL - 40

SP - 684

EP - 689

JO - Medical Teacher

JF - Medical Teacher

SN - 0142-159X

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 56129382