Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

The association of prior carpal tunnel syndrome surgery with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and long-term mortality after aortic valve replacement

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Harvard

APA

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{53e85c2a57264ac8addf3164a6e7b381,
title = "The association of prior carpal tunnel syndrome surgery with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and long-term mortality after aortic valve replacement",
abstract = "Aims: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis have a 6-16% prevalence of occult cardiac amyloidosis. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in cardiac amyloidosis, but whether prior CTS surgery has a prognostic impact in patients undergoing AVR is unknown. This study examined the association between prior CTS surgery and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with AVR.Methods and results: Using Danish nationwide registries, we retrospectively identified patients undergoing first-time AVR from 2005 to 2018, examining the association between previous CTS and adverse cardiovascular outcomes the following 5 years after the AVR procedure. Cumulative incidence functions and adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess differences. Among 19,211 patients undergoing AVR, 2.5% (n = 472) had prior CTS surgery. Patients in the CTS-cohort were significantly older (median age 75.7 [IQR 68.1-82.3] vs 73.7 [IQR 66.0-79.6]), more often female and had more comorbidities. Prior CTS surgery was not associated with differences in hospitalization for heart failure (11.2% [95% CI 8.3-14.7] vs 9.4% [95% CI 9.0-9.9]), atrial fibrillation (11.1% [95% CI 8.2-14.5] vs 11.2% [95% CI 10.8-11.7]) or pacemaker implantation (6.2% [95% CI 4.0-9.0] vs 5.1% [95% CI 4.8-5.5]). The 5-year mortality (32.8% [27.6-38.0] vs 25.2% [24.5-25.9]) was higher in the CTS-cohort. CTS was significantly associated with increased 5-year mortality (HR 1.27 [1.05-1.53]) in crude models, however, after multivariable adjustment prior CTS surgery was not associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes.Conclusion: Previous CTS surgery was not associated with increased risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes after AVR.",
keywords = "Aortic valve replacement, Cardiac amyloidosis, Carpal tunnel syndrome",
author = "Oscar Westin and Lauridsen, {Marie D} and Kristensen, {S{\o}ren Lund} and Lars K{\o}ber and Christian Torp-Pedersen and Gunnar Gislason and Lars S{\o}ndergaard and Maurer, {Mathew S} and Leicht, {Birgitte Pernille} and Finn Gustafsson and Fosb{\o}l, {Emil L}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 The Authors.",
year = "2021",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1016/j.ijcha.2021.100741",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "100741",
journal = "IJC Heart and Vasculature",
issn = "2352-9067",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association of prior carpal tunnel syndrome surgery with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and long-term mortality after aortic valve replacement

AU - Westin, Oscar

AU - Lauridsen, Marie D

AU - Kristensen, Søren Lund

AU - Køber, Lars

AU - Torp-Pedersen, Christian

AU - Gislason, Gunnar

AU - Søndergaard, Lars

AU - Maurer, Mathew S

AU - Leicht, Birgitte Pernille

AU - Gustafsson, Finn

AU - Fosbøl, Emil L

N1 - © 2021 The Authors.

PY - 2021/4

Y1 - 2021/4

N2 - Aims: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis have a 6-16% prevalence of occult cardiac amyloidosis. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in cardiac amyloidosis, but whether prior CTS surgery has a prognostic impact in patients undergoing AVR is unknown. This study examined the association between prior CTS surgery and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with AVR.Methods and results: Using Danish nationwide registries, we retrospectively identified patients undergoing first-time AVR from 2005 to 2018, examining the association between previous CTS and adverse cardiovascular outcomes the following 5 years after the AVR procedure. Cumulative incidence functions and adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess differences. Among 19,211 patients undergoing AVR, 2.5% (n = 472) had prior CTS surgery. Patients in the CTS-cohort were significantly older (median age 75.7 [IQR 68.1-82.3] vs 73.7 [IQR 66.0-79.6]), more often female and had more comorbidities. Prior CTS surgery was not associated with differences in hospitalization for heart failure (11.2% [95% CI 8.3-14.7] vs 9.4% [95% CI 9.0-9.9]), atrial fibrillation (11.1% [95% CI 8.2-14.5] vs 11.2% [95% CI 10.8-11.7]) or pacemaker implantation (6.2% [95% CI 4.0-9.0] vs 5.1% [95% CI 4.8-5.5]). The 5-year mortality (32.8% [27.6-38.0] vs 25.2% [24.5-25.9]) was higher in the CTS-cohort. CTS was significantly associated with increased 5-year mortality (HR 1.27 [1.05-1.53]) in crude models, however, after multivariable adjustment prior CTS surgery was not associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes.Conclusion: Previous CTS surgery was not associated with increased risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes after AVR.

AB - Aims: Patients undergoing aortic valve replacement (AVR) for severe aortic stenosis have a 6-16% prevalence of occult cardiac amyloidosis. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is common in cardiac amyloidosis, but whether prior CTS surgery has a prognostic impact in patients undergoing AVR is unknown. This study examined the association between prior CTS surgery and adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients treated with AVR.Methods and results: Using Danish nationwide registries, we retrospectively identified patients undergoing first-time AVR from 2005 to 2018, examining the association between previous CTS and adverse cardiovascular outcomes the following 5 years after the AVR procedure. Cumulative incidence functions and adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess differences. Among 19,211 patients undergoing AVR, 2.5% (n = 472) had prior CTS surgery. Patients in the CTS-cohort were significantly older (median age 75.7 [IQR 68.1-82.3] vs 73.7 [IQR 66.0-79.6]), more often female and had more comorbidities. Prior CTS surgery was not associated with differences in hospitalization for heart failure (11.2% [95% CI 8.3-14.7] vs 9.4% [95% CI 9.0-9.9]), atrial fibrillation (11.1% [95% CI 8.2-14.5] vs 11.2% [95% CI 10.8-11.7]) or pacemaker implantation (6.2% [95% CI 4.0-9.0] vs 5.1% [95% CI 4.8-5.5]). The 5-year mortality (32.8% [27.6-38.0] vs 25.2% [24.5-25.9]) was higher in the CTS-cohort. CTS was significantly associated with increased 5-year mortality (HR 1.27 [1.05-1.53]) in crude models, however, after multivariable adjustment prior CTS surgery was not associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes.Conclusion: Previous CTS surgery was not associated with increased risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes after AVR.

KW - Aortic valve replacement

KW - Cardiac amyloidosis

KW - Carpal tunnel syndrome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85102028165&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijcha.2021.100741

DO - 10.1016/j.ijcha.2021.100741

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33732868

VL - 33

SP - 100741

JO - IJC Heart and Vasculature

JF - IJC Heart and Vasculature

SN - 2352-9067

M1 - 100741

ER -

ID: 64351207