Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Surgical simulation: Current practices and future perspectives for technical skills training

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Response to: Patient-centred medical education: A proposed definition

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. The effect of distributed virtual reality simulation training on cognitive load during subsequent dissection training

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Twelve tips for assessing surgical performance and use of technical assessment scales

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Feasibility of self-directed learning in clerkships

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Simulation-based training for flexible cystoscopy - A randomized trial comparing two approaches

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Implementering af evidensbaseret simulationstræning

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Correlation of virtual reality performance with real-life cataract surgery performance

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Computer analysis of individual cataract surgery segments in the operating room

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer
Simulation-based training (SBT) has become a standard component of modern surgical education, yet successful implementation of evidence-based training programs remains challenging. In this narrative review, we use Kern’s framework for curriculum development to describe where we are now and what lies ahead for SBT within surgery with a focus on technical skills in operative procedures. Despite principles for optimal SBT (proficiency-based, distributed, and deliberate practice) having been identified, massed training with fixed time intervals or a fixed number of repetitions is still being extensively used, and simulators are generally underutilized. SBT should be part of surgical training curricula, including theoretical, technical, and non-technical skills, and be based on relevant needs assessments. Furthermore, training should follow evidence-based theoretical principles for optimal training, and the effect of training needs to be evaluated using relevant outcomes. There is a larger, still unrealized potential of surgical SBT, which may be realized in the near future as simulator technologies evolve, more evidence-based training programs are implemented, and cost-effectiveness and impact on patient safety is clearly demonstrated.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftMedical Teacher
Vol/bind40
Udgave nummer7
Sider (fra-til)668-675
Antal sider8
ISSN0142-159X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jul. 2018

ID: 55663634