Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Stereologic Investigation of Mastoid Air Cell Geometry: Volume, Surface Area, and Anisotropy

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Cochlear MRI Signal Change Following Vestibular Schwannoma Resection Depends on Surgical Approach

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Superior Canal Dehiscence Surgery Outcomes Following Failed Round Window Surgery

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Dynamic soft tissue changes in the orbit after a blowout fracture

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Reposition Chair Treatment Improves Subjective Outcomes in Refractory Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. The Dimensions of the Orbital Cavity Based on High-Resolution Computed Tomography of Human Cadavers

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Repositioning chairs in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: implications and clinical outcome

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

OBJECTIVE: To assess mastoid geometry using computed tomography (CT) scans and design-based stereological methods.

BACKGROUND: The anatomical organization of the mastoid air cell system (MACS) remains debated. Geometrical parameters have previously been determined by automated image-analysis algorithms. Stereology is an alternative approach, which has previously been applied to estimate the volume of the MACS, but has not previously been used to estimate surface area or study anisotropy.

METHODS: Twenty-three clinical CT scans of aerated temporal bones obtained from various ENT patients were studied. The structural orientation and anisotropy of the MACS was investigated by test-grid rotation and rose plots. Volume, surface area, and surface area-to-volume ratio were estimated with design-based stereology.

RESULTS: Anisotropy of the mastoid air cells was demonstrated by a significant difference in surface area estimates between the axial and coronal planes (p = 0.0065). Rose plots illustrated variances in surface area estimates with different grid rotations, and a minimum value in the craniocaudal direction was shown. Sampling in the axial plane provided the least variance due to anisotropy. The mean (±SD) volume and surface area estimates were 5.71 ± 2.98 cm and 117 cm ± 60 cm, respectively. A large biological variation was noted. The mean (±SD) surface-to-volume ratio was 20.6 ± 2.8 cm.

CONCLUSIONS: The stereological technique proved to be a robust method for volume and surface area estimation in clinical CT scans. The mastoid air cells constitute an anisotropic cell-system that seems to have a predominant orientation in the craniocaudal direction.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftOtology & neurotology : official publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
Vol/bind41
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)e630-e637
ISSN1531-7129
DOI
StatusUdgivet - jun. 2020

ID: 59872495