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Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Sinus bacteriology in patients with cystic fibrosis or primary ciliary dyskinesia: A systematic review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: A correlation exists between the microbial flora of the upper and lower airways in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) or with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The sinuses can function as a bacterial reservoir where gram-negative bacteria adapt to the airways and repeatedly are aspirated to and colonize the lungs according to the theory of the united (unified) airways. Whereas the pattern of bacterial flora in the lower airways has been extensively studied, the upper airways have drawn limited attention.

OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to review the literature that reported bacterial flora in the sinuses and nasal cavities of patients with CF or PCD.

METHODS: A number of medical literature data bases were systematically searched between January 1960 and July 2016. We applied the following inclusion criteria: a minimum of one case of PCD (or Kartagener syndrome) or CF, and microbiology analyses from the nose or paranasal sinuses.

RESULTS: We included 46 studies (1823 patients) from 16 countries. Staphylococcus aureus was found in 30% of the noses and sinuses of patients with CF. Other common bacteria found included Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase negative staphylococci, and Haemophilus influenzae. In PCD, H. influenzae was the most common bacteria (28%), followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and P. aeruginosa. If studies that included nonsurgical swab and blowing samples were excluded, then P. aeruginosa was the most common bacterium in patients with CF (34%) and in patients with PCD (50%), followed by S. aureus and H. influenza.

CONCLUSION: S. aureus, P. aeruginosa, coagulase negative staphylococci, and H. influenzae dominated in the upper airways of patients with CF. In patients with PCD, H. influenzae, S. pneumoniae, and P. aeruginosa dominated. When studies that included swab and blowing samples were excluded, P. aeruginosa was the most common bacterium in both groups. Direct comparisons among the studies were restricted due to very heterogeneous methods, and a better standardization of procedures and outcomes is needed.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Rhinology and Allergy
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)293-298
Antal sider6
ISSN1945-8924
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 sep. 2017

ID: 52573099