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Prevalence of anti-Hepatitis E virus immunoglobulin G in HIV-infected individuals over three decades

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@article{a17a90f0e6824ba0a49d03bd36bb1bdc,
title = "Prevalence of anti-Hepatitis E virus immunoglobulin G in HIV-infected individuals over three decades",
abstract = "Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV)genotype 3 is endemic in Europe, and the infection is mostly subclinical or acute and self-limiting. However, persistent infection is described among HIV-infected individuals. The prevalence of antibodies against HEV (anti-HEV)among HIV-infected persons varies geographically and is unknown in Denmark. Rates of co-infection with HEV among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark over three decades, from the early 1980s to 2013, were investigated. Methods: A total of 2506 HIV-infected persons were investigated from two cohorts followed at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. Blood samples were tested retrospectively for anti-HEV, including samples from 2216 persons who were enrolled in a prospective clinical cohort and followed between 1995 and 2013, as well as samples from 290 persons from a historical cohort followed between 1980 and 1994. For anti-HEV seroconverting individuals, serial samples were tested for HEV RNA. Factors associated with anti-HEV status were explored using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: The overall HEV seroprevalence rates were stable during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000–2013 (23.1%, 22.9%, and 23.7%, respectively). In all decades, rates of anti-HEV increased with older age, and anti-HEV seropositivity was associated with older generations, HIV risk group, and geographic origin. Persistent HEV infection was not detected in any of 57 individuals with anti-HEV seroconversion. Conclusions: HEV seroprevalence rates were stable in HIV-infected individuals from the early 1980s to 2013. Rates increased with age. No evidence of persistent HEV infection was detected. Infection with HEV is frequent, but persistent HEV infection is rare among HIV-infected individuals.",
keywords = "HEV, HIV, Hepatitis E virus, Persistent HEV RNA, Prevalence, Immunoglobulin G/blood, Humans, Middle Aged, Risk Factors, Male, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Coinfection/epidemiology, Hepatitis Antibodies/blood, Hepatitis E virus/immunology, HIV Infections/complications, Adult, Female",
author = "Harritsh{\o}j, {Lene Holm} and Kirkegaard-Klitbo, {Ditte Marie} and Niels Mejer and Inge Panum and Midgley, {Sofie Elisabeth} and Henrik Ullum and Thomas Benfield",
note = "Copyright {\textcopyright} 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1016/j.ijid.2019.04.029",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "67--72",
journal = "International Journal of Infectious Diseases",
issn = "1201-9712",
publisher = "Elsevier Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prevalence of anti-Hepatitis E virus immunoglobulin G in HIV-infected individuals over three decades

AU - Harritshøj, Lene Holm

AU - Kirkegaard-Klitbo, Ditte Marie

AU - Mejer, Niels

AU - Panum, Inge

AU - Midgley, Sofie Elisabeth

AU - Ullum, Henrik

AU - Benfield, Thomas

N1 - Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/7

Y1 - 2019/7

N2 - Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV)genotype 3 is endemic in Europe, and the infection is mostly subclinical or acute and self-limiting. However, persistent infection is described among HIV-infected individuals. The prevalence of antibodies against HEV (anti-HEV)among HIV-infected persons varies geographically and is unknown in Denmark. Rates of co-infection with HEV among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark over three decades, from the early 1980s to 2013, were investigated. Methods: A total of 2506 HIV-infected persons were investigated from two cohorts followed at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. Blood samples were tested retrospectively for anti-HEV, including samples from 2216 persons who were enrolled in a prospective clinical cohort and followed between 1995 and 2013, as well as samples from 290 persons from a historical cohort followed between 1980 and 1994. For anti-HEV seroconverting individuals, serial samples were tested for HEV RNA. Factors associated with anti-HEV status were explored using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: The overall HEV seroprevalence rates were stable during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000–2013 (23.1%, 22.9%, and 23.7%, respectively). In all decades, rates of anti-HEV increased with older age, and anti-HEV seropositivity was associated with older generations, HIV risk group, and geographic origin. Persistent HEV infection was not detected in any of 57 individuals with anti-HEV seroconversion. Conclusions: HEV seroprevalence rates were stable in HIV-infected individuals from the early 1980s to 2013. Rates increased with age. No evidence of persistent HEV infection was detected. Infection with HEV is frequent, but persistent HEV infection is rare among HIV-infected individuals.

AB - Background: Hepatitis E virus (HEV)genotype 3 is endemic in Europe, and the infection is mostly subclinical or acute and self-limiting. However, persistent infection is described among HIV-infected individuals. The prevalence of antibodies against HEV (anti-HEV)among HIV-infected persons varies geographically and is unknown in Denmark. Rates of co-infection with HEV among HIV-infected individuals in Denmark over three decades, from the early 1980s to 2013, were investigated. Methods: A total of 2506 HIV-infected persons were investigated from two cohorts followed at Hvidovre Hospital, Denmark. Blood samples were tested retrospectively for anti-HEV, including samples from 2216 persons who were enrolled in a prospective clinical cohort and followed between 1995 and 2013, as well as samples from 290 persons from a historical cohort followed between 1980 and 1994. For anti-HEV seroconverting individuals, serial samples were tested for HEV RNA. Factors associated with anti-HEV status were explored using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results: The overall HEV seroprevalence rates were stable during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000–2013 (23.1%, 22.9%, and 23.7%, respectively). In all decades, rates of anti-HEV increased with older age, and anti-HEV seropositivity was associated with older generations, HIV risk group, and geographic origin. Persistent HEV infection was not detected in any of 57 individuals with anti-HEV seroconversion. Conclusions: HEV seroprevalence rates were stable in HIV-infected individuals from the early 1980s to 2013. Rates increased with age. No evidence of persistent HEV infection was detected. Infection with HEV is frequent, but persistent HEV infection is rare among HIV-infected individuals.

KW - HEV

KW - HIV

KW - Hepatitis E virus

KW - Persistent HEV RNA

KW - Prevalence

KW - Immunoglobulin G/blood

KW - Humans

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Risk Factors

KW - Male

KW - Seroepidemiologic Studies

KW - Coinfection/epidemiology

KW - Hepatitis Antibodies/blood

KW - Hepatitis E virus/immunology

KW - HIV Infections/complications

KW - Adult

KW - Female

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065973839&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijid.2019.04.029

DO - 10.1016/j.ijid.2019.04.029

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31063824

VL - 84

SP - 67

EP - 72

JO - International Journal of Infectious Diseases

JF - International Journal of Infectious Diseases

SN - 1201-9712

ER -

ID: 57103291