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Persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury: Deep phenotyping and treatment patterns

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@article{ad4deb9ac49c41efaaf353c3c63df822,
title = "Persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury: Deep phenotyping and treatment patterns",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury.METHODS: A total of 100 individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury were enrolled between July 2018 and June 2019. Deep phenotyping was performed using a semi-structured interview while allodynia was assessed using the 12-item Allodynia Symptom Checklist.RESULTS: In 100 subjects with persistent post-traumatic headache, the mean headache frequency was 25.4 ± 7.1 days per month. The most common headache phenotype was chronic migraine-like headache (n = 61) followed by combined episodic migraine-like and tension-type-like headache (n = 29) while nine subjects reported {"}pure{"} chronic tension-type-like headache. The most frequent trigger factors were stress, lack of sleep, and bright lights. A history of preventive medication use was reported by 63 subjects, of which 79{\%} reported failure of at least one preventive drug, while 19{\%} reported failure of at least four preventive drugs. Cutaneous allodynia was absent in 54{\%} of the subjects, mild in 23{\%}, moderate in 17{\%}, and severe in 6{\%}.CONCLUSIONS: The headache profile of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache most often resembled a chronic migraine-like phenotype or a combined episodic migraine-like and tension-type-like headache phenotype. Migraine-specific preventive medications were largely reported to be ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need for pathophysiological insights and disease-specific therapies.",
keywords = "clinical management, Concussion, head injury, head trauma",
author = "H{\aa}kan Ashina and Afrim Iljazi and Al-Khazali, {Haidar Muhsen} and Sait Ashina and Jensen, {Rigmor H{\o}jland} and Amin, {Faisal Mohammad} and Messoud Ashina and {Winther Schytz}, Henrik",
year = "2020",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1177/0333102420909865",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "554--564",
journal = "Cephalalgia",
issn = "0333-1024",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury

T2 - Deep phenotyping and treatment patterns

AU - Ashina, Håkan

AU - Iljazi, Afrim

AU - Al-Khazali, Haidar Muhsen

AU - Ashina, Sait

AU - Jensen, Rigmor Højland

AU - Amin, Faisal Mohammad

AU - Ashina, Messoud

AU - Winther Schytz, Henrik

PY - 2020/5

Y1 - 2020/5

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury.METHODS: A total of 100 individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury were enrolled between July 2018 and June 2019. Deep phenotyping was performed using a semi-structured interview while allodynia was assessed using the 12-item Allodynia Symptom Checklist.RESULTS: In 100 subjects with persistent post-traumatic headache, the mean headache frequency was 25.4 ± 7.1 days per month. The most common headache phenotype was chronic migraine-like headache (n = 61) followed by combined episodic migraine-like and tension-type-like headache (n = 29) while nine subjects reported "pure" chronic tension-type-like headache. The most frequent trigger factors were stress, lack of sleep, and bright lights. A history of preventive medication use was reported by 63 subjects, of which 79% reported failure of at least one preventive drug, while 19% reported failure of at least four preventive drugs. Cutaneous allodynia was absent in 54% of the subjects, mild in 23%, moderate in 17%, and severe in 6%.CONCLUSIONS: The headache profile of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache most often resembled a chronic migraine-like phenotype or a combined episodic migraine-like and tension-type-like headache phenotype. Migraine-specific preventive medications were largely reported to be ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need for pathophysiological insights and disease-specific therapies.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate clinical characteristics and treatment patterns in persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury.METHODS: A total of 100 individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache attributed to mild traumatic brain injury were enrolled between July 2018 and June 2019. Deep phenotyping was performed using a semi-structured interview while allodynia was assessed using the 12-item Allodynia Symptom Checklist.RESULTS: In 100 subjects with persistent post-traumatic headache, the mean headache frequency was 25.4 ± 7.1 days per month. The most common headache phenotype was chronic migraine-like headache (n = 61) followed by combined episodic migraine-like and tension-type-like headache (n = 29) while nine subjects reported "pure" chronic tension-type-like headache. The most frequent trigger factors were stress, lack of sleep, and bright lights. A history of preventive medication use was reported by 63 subjects, of which 79% reported failure of at least one preventive drug, while 19% reported failure of at least four preventive drugs. Cutaneous allodynia was absent in 54% of the subjects, mild in 23%, moderate in 17%, and severe in 6%.CONCLUSIONS: The headache profile of individuals with persistent post-traumatic headache most often resembled a chronic migraine-like phenotype or a combined episodic migraine-like and tension-type-like headache phenotype. Migraine-specific preventive medications were largely reported to be ineffective. Therefore, there is a pressing need for pathophysiological insights and disease-specific therapies.

KW - clinical management

KW - Concussion

KW - head injury

KW - head trauma

U2 - 10.1177/0333102420909865

DO - 10.1177/0333102420909865

M3 - Journal article

VL - 40

SP - 554

EP - 564

JO - Cephalalgia

JF - Cephalalgia

SN - 0333-1024

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 59474275