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'Now she has become my daughter': parents' early experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants

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@article{a2b4977bd2a2498fbcb2e1a4211869de,
title = "'Now she has become my daughter': parents' early experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Based on the Family-Centred Care philosophy, skin-to-skin contact is a key activity in neonatal care, and use of this practice is increasing also with extremely preterm infants. Little is known about parents' immediate experiences of and readiness for skin-to-skin contact, while their fragile infant may still not be 'on safe ground'. Knowledge about parents' experiences might reduce doubt and reluctance among healthcare professionals to use skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants and thus increase its dissemination in practice.AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore parents' immediate experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants <28-week postmenstrual age.METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN: A qualitative study using thematic analysis.RESEARCH METHODS: Thirteen semi-structured interviews conducted in 2008 with 16 parents after skin-to-skin contact with their extremely preterm infants analysed using inductive thematic analysis.FINDINGS: Parents' experiences were related to the process before, during and after skin-to-skin contact and moved from ambivalence to appreciating skin-to-skin contact as beneficial for both parents and infant. The process comprised three stages: (i) overcoming ambivalence through professional support and personal experience; (ii) proximity creating parental feelings and an inner need to provide care; (iii) feeling useful as a parent and realising the importance of skin-to-skin contact. Having repeatedly gone through stages 2 and 3, parents developed an overall confidence in the value of bonding, independent of the infant's survival.CONCLUSIONS: Parents progressed from ambivalence to a feeling of fundamental mutual needs for skin-to-skin contact. Parents found the bonding facilitated by skin-to-skin contact to be valuable, regardless of the infant's survival.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Ragnhild Maastrup and Janne Weis and Engsig, {Anne B} and Johannsen, {Kirsten L} and Vibeke Zoffmann",
note = "{\circledC} 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1111/scs.12478",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "545--553",
journal = "Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences",
issn = "0283-9318",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'Now she has become my daughter'

T2 - parents' early experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants

AU - Maastrup, Ragnhild

AU - Weis, Janne

AU - Engsig, Anne B

AU - Johannsen, Kirsten L

AU - Zoffmann, Vibeke

N1 - © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - BACKGROUND: Based on the Family-Centred Care philosophy, skin-to-skin contact is a key activity in neonatal care, and use of this practice is increasing also with extremely preterm infants. Little is known about parents' immediate experiences of and readiness for skin-to-skin contact, while their fragile infant may still not be 'on safe ground'. Knowledge about parents' experiences might reduce doubt and reluctance among healthcare professionals to use skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants and thus increase its dissemination in practice.AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore parents' immediate experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants <28-week postmenstrual age.METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN: A qualitative study using thematic analysis.RESEARCH METHODS: Thirteen semi-structured interviews conducted in 2008 with 16 parents after skin-to-skin contact with their extremely preterm infants analysed using inductive thematic analysis.FINDINGS: Parents' experiences were related to the process before, during and after skin-to-skin contact and moved from ambivalence to appreciating skin-to-skin contact as beneficial for both parents and infant. The process comprised three stages: (i) overcoming ambivalence through professional support and personal experience; (ii) proximity creating parental feelings and an inner need to provide care; (iii) feeling useful as a parent and realising the importance of skin-to-skin contact. Having repeatedly gone through stages 2 and 3, parents developed an overall confidence in the value of bonding, independent of the infant's survival.CONCLUSIONS: Parents progressed from ambivalence to a feeling of fundamental mutual needs for skin-to-skin contact. Parents found the bonding facilitated by skin-to-skin contact to be valuable, regardless of the infant's survival.

AB - BACKGROUND: Based on the Family-Centred Care philosophy, skin-to-skin contact is a key activity in neonatal care, and use of this practice is increasing also with extremely preterm infants. Little is known about parents' immediate experiences of and readiness for skin-to-skin contact, while their fragile infant may still not be 'on safe ground'. Knowledge about parents' experiences might reduce doubt and reluctance among healthcare professionals to use skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants and thus increase its dissemination in practice.AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore parents' immediate experiences of skin-to-skin contact with extremely preterm infants <28-week postmenstrual age.METHODOLOGICAL DESIGN: A qualitative study using thematic analysis.RESEARCH METHODS: Thirteen semi-structured interviews conducted in 2008 with 16 parents after skin-to-skin contact with their extremely preterm infants analysed using inductive thematic analysis.FINDINGS: Parents' experiences were related to the process before, during and after skin-to-skin contact and moved from ambivalence to appreciating skin-to-skin contact as beneficial for both parents and infant. The process comprised three stages: (i) overcoming ambivalence through professional support and personal experience; (ii) proximity creating parental feelings and an inner need to provide care; (iii) feeling useful as a parent and realising the importance of skin-to-skin contact. Having repeatedly gone through stages 2 and 3, parents developed an overall confidence in the value of bonding, independent of the infant's survival.CONCLUSIONS: Parents progressed from ambivalence to a feeling of fundamental mutual needs for skin-to-skin contact. Parents found the bonding facilitated by skin-to-skin contact to be valuable, regardless of the infant's survival.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1111/scs.12478

DO - 10.1111/scs.12478

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 545

EP - 553

JO - Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

JF - Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences

SN - 0283-9318

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 52590632