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Long-Term Lung Function and Exercise Capacity in Postinfectious chILD

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@article{7a000b34dcf543d0a50b8a80711fcc72,
title = "Long-Term Lung Function and Exercise Capacity in Postinfectious chILD",
abstract = "Background: Severe postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease may clinically mimic other entities of children's interstitial lung disease and is clinically challenging comprising various disease severities despite treatment. Long-term lung function trend and physical capacity in children with postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease are rarely reported. We investigated trends in pulmonary function by long-term follow-up and assessed physical capacity in such patients. Methods: We performed a descriptive, single-center follow-up study in children with biopsy-verified postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease. Patients with completed primary treatment course were eligible for follow-up, including pulmonary function and exercise (VO2peak) testing. Results: Thirty patients with postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease were identified and included. Median (range) age at diagnose was 27.5 (2-172) months after a mean lag time of 23 months. H. influenzae and rhinovirus were the most frequent pathogens. Fifteen patients were available for follow-up after mean (range) 7.6 (2-15) years of treatment completion. Lung clearance index (LCI2.5), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and bronchodilator responsiveness were abnormal in 80{\%}, 53{\%}, and 44{\%}, respectively. Diffusion capacity for monoxide was abnormal in 7{\%} and total lung capacity in 33{\%}. Only 8{\%} demonstrated low VO2peak, while 40{\%} reported difficulties during physical exertion. Longitudinal data on spirometry (n = 14) remained unchanged from end of treatment throughout follow-up. A significant association was found between zLCI2.5 and zFEV1 (multiple linear regression; r2 = 0.61; P = 0.0003). Conclusion: Postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease in children carries a varying degree of chronic pulmonary impairment with onset of symptoms in the first months of life and a typical considerable lag time before diagnosis. Follow-up several years after the initial injury demonstrated moderate-to-severe peripheral airway impairment although no further lung function decline was found years after completion of treatment. Despite acceptable VO2peak, a considerable proportion struggled during heavy exercise.",
author = "Yagmur Sisman and Buchvald, {Frederik F} and Ring, {Astrid Madsen} and Katharina Wassilew and Nielsen, {Kim Gjerum}",
year = "2019",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1089/ped.2018.0973",
language = "English",
volume = "32",
pages = "4--11",
journal = "Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology",
issn = "2151-321X",
publisher = "Mary Ann/Liebert, Inc. Publishers",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-Term Lung Function and Exercise Capacity in Postinfectious chILD

AU - Sisman, Yagmur

AU - Buchvald, Frederik F

AU - Ring, Astrid Madsen

AU - Wassilew, Katharina

AU - Nielsen, Kim Gjerum

PY - 2019/3/1

Y1 - 2019/3/1

N2 - Background: Severe postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease may clinically mimic other entities of children's interstitial lung disease and is clinically challenging comprising various disease severities despite treatment. Long-term lung function trend and physical capacity in children with postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease are rarely reported. We investigated trends in pulmonary function by long-term follow-up and assessed physical capacity in such patients. Methods: We performed a descriptive, single-center follow-up study in children with biopsy-verified postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease. Patients with completed primary treatment course were eligible for follow-up, including pulmonary function and exercise (VO2peak) testing. Results: Thirty patients with postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease were identified and included. Median (range) age at diagnose was 27.5 (2-172) months after a mean lag time of 23 months. H. influenzae and rhinovirus were the most frequent pathogens. Fifteen patients were available for follow-up after mean (range) 7.6 (2-15) years of treatment completion. Lung clearance index (LCI2.5), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and bronchodilator responsiveness were abnormal in 80%, 53%, and 44%, respectively. Diffusion capacity for monoxide was abnormal in 7% and total lung capacity in 33%. Only 8% demonstrated low VO2peak, while 40% reported difficulties during physical exertion. Longitudinal data on spirometry (n = 14) remained unchanged from end of treatment throughout follow-up. A significant association was found between zLCI2.5 and zFEV1 (multiple linear regression; r2 = 0.61; P = 0.0003). Conclusion: Postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease in children carries a varying degree of chronic pulmonary impairment with onset of symptoms in the first months of life and a typical considerable lag time before diagnosis. Follow-up several years after the initial injury demonstrated moderate-to-severe peripheral airway impairment although no further lung function decline was found years after completion of treatment. Despite acceptable VO2peak, a considerable proportion struggled during heavy exercise.

AB - Background: Severe postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease may clinically mimic other entities of children's interstitial lung disease and is clinically challenging comprising various disease severities despite treatment. Long-term lung function trend and physical capacity in children with postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease are rarely reported. We investigated trends in pulmonary function by long-term follow-up and assessed physical capacity in such patients. Methods: We performed a descriptive, single-center follow-up study in children with biopsy-verified postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease. Patients with completed primary treatment course were eligible for follow-up, including pulmonary function and exercise (VO2peak) testing. Results: Thirty patients with postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease were identified and included. Median (range) age at diagnose was 27.5 (2-172) months after a mean lag time of 23 months. H. influenzae and rhinovirus were the most frequent pathogens. Fifteen patients were available for follow-up after mean (range) 7.6 (2-15) years of treatment completion. Lung clearance index (LCI2.5), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and bronchodilator responsiveness were abnormal in 80%, 53%, and 44%, respectively. Diffusion capacity for monoxide was abnormal in 7% and total lung capacity in 33%. Only 8% demonstrated low VO2peak, while 40% reported difficulties during physical exertion. Longitudinal data on spirometry (n = 14) remained unchanged from end of treatment throughout follow-up. A significant association was found between zLCI2.5 and zFEV1 (multiple linear regression; r2 = 0.61; P = 0.0003). Conclusion: Postinfectious diffuse pulmonary disease in children carries a varying degree of chronic pulmonary impairment with onset of symptoms in the first months of life and a typical considerable lag time before diagnosis. Follow-up several years after the initial injury demonstrated moderate-to-severe peripheral airway impairment although no further lung function decline was found years after completion of treatment. Despite acceptable VO2peak, a considerable proportion struggled during heavy exercise.

U2 - 10.1089/ped.2018.0973

DO - 10.1089/ped.2018.0973

M3 - Journal article

VL - 32

SP - 4

EP - 11

JO - Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology

JF - Pediatric, Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology

SN - 2151-321X

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 58277788