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Incidence rates of dilated cardiomyopathy in adult first-degree relatives versus matched controls

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Vis graf over relationer

Background: The incidence rates and importance of traditional risk factors in dilated cardiomyopathy among first-degree relatives are unknown.

Methods and Results: We identified all probands with dilated cardiomyopathy (n = 13,714, mean age at diagnosis 63 years) from the Danish nationwide registries between 1994 and 2017. Incidence rates among first-degree relatives (n = 29,671, mean age 38 years) and for up to 10 age- and sex-matched controls were calculated. Totally 233 (0.8%) first-degree relatives and 285 (0.1%) controls developed dilated cardiomyopathy during a median follow-up of 8.2 (Q1-Q3 4.4-13.3) years. Incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years) were 86.4 (95% confidence interval 73.9-101.0) and 111.1 (79.4-128.7) for first-degree relatives aged < 50 and ≥ 50 years, respectively, versus 7.5 (6.4-8.9) and 19.7 (16.8-23.2) for controls. Atrial fibrillation, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and hypertension were associated with increased risks of developing dilated cardiomyopathy both in first-degree relatives and controls. Population attributable fractions for the 4 risk factors were 27.7% for first-degree relatives and 37.3% for controls aged < 50 years, and 46.4% versus 58.4% for first-degree relatives and controls among people aged ≥ 50 years, respectively.

Conclusions: The absolute incidence rates of dilated cardiomyopathy in first-degree relatives to patients with dilated cardiomyopathy were low, but significantly higher than in matched controls and elevated by the presence of additional risk factors, especially atrial fibrillation. Additional investigations are warranted to assess whether aggressive treatment of risk factors translates into a reduction of dilated cardiomyopathy in first-degree relatives.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
Artikelnummer101065
TidsskriftInternational journal of cardiology. Heart & vasculature
Vol/bind41
Sider (fra-til)101065
ISSN2352-9067
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2022

Bibliografisk note

© 2022 Published by Elsevier B.V.

ID: 78426887