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Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment-initiation on disease stage and survival in oral cavity cancer: a systematic review

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

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AIM/OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to systematically review the literature on the impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment of oral cavity cancer.

METHODS: PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for articles reporting impact of delay in diagnosis and treatment on cancer-stage and survival of oral cavity cancer. Studies comprising at least ten patients, and published since the year 2000, were included.

RESULTS: Sixteen studies (n = 45,001, range: 62-18,677 per study, 83% men), from Australia, Asia, Europe, North America and South America, met the inclusion criteria. Eleven studies (n = 1,460) examined delay in diagnosis, while five studies (n = 43,541) reported delay in treatment. Eight of the eleven studies, examining delay in diagnosis (n = 1,220), analyzed the correlation between delay in diagnosis and tumor stage at diagnosis. Three studies found a significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage at diagnosis (p < 0.05), whereas three other studies did not. The studies reporting a significant correlation were from Asian countries, whereas the three studies that did not find a correlation were from other continents. Studies reporting on professional delay and total diagnostic delay, generally, did not find a significant correlation with advanced cancer at diagnosis. Time to treatment (TTI), defined as time from diagnosis to treatment, was found significantly correlated with survival in three studies (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.05), and nonsignificant in two studies.

CONCLUSION: A significant correlation between patient delay and advanced stage cancer was reported in Asian studies only, while professional delay and total diagnostic delay were generally found to be non-correlated with advanced stage cancer at diagnosis. TTI was in some studies reported to be correlated with poorer outcome, while other studies did not report a correlation. One study presented that there was no clear advantage in overall survival (OS) for patients treated within 30 days, compared to patients treated between 30 and 44 days.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftActa Oncologica
Vol/bind60
Udgave nummer9
Sider (fra-til)1083-1090
Antal sider8
ISSN0284-186X
DOI
StatusUdgivet - sep. 2021

ID: 67742125