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Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

HIV pre-test information, discussion or counselling? A review of guidance relevant to the WHO European Region

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

DOI

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  • Stephen A Bell
  • Valerie Delpech
  • Dorthe Raben
  • Jordi Casabona
  • Nino Tsereteli
  • John de Wit
Vis graf over relationer

In the context of a shift from exceptionalism to normalisation, this study examines recommendations/evidence in current pan-European/global guidelines regarding pre-test HIV testing and counselling practices in health care settings. It also reviews new research not yet included in guidelines. There is consensus that verbal informed consent must be gained prior to testing, individually, in private, confidentially, in the presence of a health care provider. All guidelines recommend pre-test information/discussion delivered verbally or via other methods (information sheet). There is agreement about a minimum standard of information to be provided before a test, but guidelines differ regarding discussion about issues encouraging patients to think about implications of the result. There is heavy reliance on expert consultation in guideline development. Referenced scientific evidence is often more than ten years old and based on US/UK research. Eight new papers are reviewed. Current HIV testing and counselling guidelines have inconsistencies regarding the extent and type of information that is recommended during pre-test discussions. The lack of new research underscores a need for new evidence from a range of European settings to support the process of expert consultation in guideline development.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftInternational Journal of STD and AIDS
Vol/bind27
Udgave nummer2
Sider (fra-til)97-104
Antal sider8
ISSN0956-4624
DOI
StatusUdgivet - feb. 2016

ID: 55468588