Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Factors associated with favorable changes in food preferences after bariatric surgery

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

DOI

  1. Different malabsorptive obesity surgery interventions result in distinct postprandial amino acid metabolomic signatures

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Gastric bypass with different biliopancreatic limb lengths results in similar post-absorptive metabolomics profiles

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Genetic Determinants of Weight Loss After Bariatric Surgery

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Bone health in patients with type 2 diabetes treated by Roux-En-Y gastric bypass and the role of diabetes remission

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Vagal Blocking for Obesity Control: a Possible Mechanism-Of-Action

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Defining NASH from a multi-omics systems biology perspective

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  2. Plasma GDF15 levels are similar between subjects after bariatric surgery and matched controls and are unaffected by meals

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Reply to Rodgers: The hepatic glucose-mobilizing effect of glucagon is not mediated by cyclic AMP most of the time

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftKommentar/debatForskningpeer review

  4. The glucose-mobilizing effect of glucagon at fasting is mediated by cyclic AMP

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  5. Neprilysin inhibition increases glucagon levels in humans and mice with potential effects on amino acid metabolism

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  • Mette S Nielsen
  • Bodil J Christensen
  • Christian Ritz
  • Lotte Holm
  • Susanne Lunn
  • Louise Tækker
  • Julie Berg Schmidt
  • Wender L P Bredie
  • Nicolai J Wewer Albrechtsen
  • Jens J Holst
  • Anja Hilbert
  • Carel W le Roux
  • Anders Sjödin
Vis graf over relationer

PURPOSE: Bariatric surgery may shift food preferences towards less energy-dense foods. Eating behavior is multifactorial, and the mechanisms driving changes in food preferences could be a combination of a physiological response to surgery and social and psychological factors. This exploratory study aimed to identify potential factors explaining the variation in changes in food preferences after bariatric surgery.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Physiological, social, and psychological data were collected before, 6 weeks or 6 months after surgery. All variables were analyzed in combination using LASSO regression to explain the variation in changes in energy density at an ad libitum buffet meal 6 months after bariatric surgery (n=39).

RESULTS: The following factors explained 69% of the variation in changes in food preferences after surgery and were associated with more favorable changes in food preferences (i.e., a larger decrease in energy density): female gender, increased secretion of glicentin, a larger decrease in the hedonic rating of sweet and fat and a fatty cocoa drink, a lower number of recent life crises, a low degree of social eating pressure, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for binge eating disorder, less effort needed to obtain preoperative weight loss, a smaller household composition, a lower degree of self-efficacy and a higher degree of depression, nutritional regime competence, and psychosocial risk level.

CONCLUSION: Factors explaining the variation in altered food preferences after bariatric surgery not only include a physiological response to surgery but also social and psychological factors.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftObesity Surgery
Vol/bind31
Udgave nummer8
Sider (fra-til)3514-3524
Antal sider11
ISSN0960-8923
DOI
StatusUdgivet - aug. 2021

ID: 66795232