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Early Life Body Size in Relation to First Intracerebral or Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

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Gjærde, Line K ; Truelsen, Thomas C ; Sørensen, Thorkild I A ; Baker, Jennifer L. / Early Life Body Size in Relation to First Intracerebral or Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. I: Stroke. 2019 ; Bind 21, Nr. 1. s. 60-68.

Bibtex

@article{ef7a6e3f3dbc4f72b41752690c1082ad,
title = "Early Life Body Size in Relation to First Intracerebral or Subarachnoid Hemorrhage",
abstract = "Background and Purpose: As risk of hemorrhagic stroke may have early life origins, we investigated associations of birth weight and childhood body mass index (BMI) with adult intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).Methods: We included 240,234 Danish schoolchildren, born 1936 to 1989, with information on birth weight and measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between early life anthropometrics and ICH or SAH, identified through linkage with national registers.Results: During the study period, 1,947 individuals (39{\%} women) experienced an ICH and 797 individuals (64{\%} women) experienced a SAH. Per 500 g increase in birth weight, women had a 10{\%} decreased risk of SAH (HR, 0.90; 95{\%} CI, 0.83 to 0.97) and men had a 10{\%} decreased risk of ICH (HR, 0.90; 95{\%} CI, 0.85 to 0.95). Birth weight was not associated with risks of ICH in women or SAH in men. In men, a childhood BMI below average (BMI z-score <0) was associated with increased risks of ICH. The association was stronger at older childhood ages, and at 13 years a BMI z-score of -1 was associated with a HR of 1.17 (95{\%} CI, 1.06 to 1.28), and a BMI z-score of -2 with a HR of 1.46 (95{\%} CI, 1.17 to 1.82) for ICH. Childhood BMI was not associated with risks of ICH in women or with risks of SAH in both sexes.Conclusions: Early life body size is associated with ICH and SAH, and the associations differ by sex.",
keywords = "Birth weight, Body mass index, Child, Cohort studies, Hemorrhage, Stroke",
author = "Gj{\ae}rde, {Line K} and Truelsen, {Thomas C} and S{\o}rensen, {Thorkild I A} and Baker, {Jennifer L}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
doi = "10.5853/jos.2018.02033",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "60--68",
journal = "Journal of Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early Life Body Size in Relation to First Intracerebral or Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

AU - Gjærde, Line K

AU - Truelsen, Thomas C

AU - Sørensen, Thorkild I A

AU - Baker, Jennifer L

PY - 2019/1

Y1 - 2019/1

N2 - Background and Purpose: As risk of hemorrhagic stroke may have early life origins, we investigated associations of birth weight and childhood body mass index (BMI) with adult intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).Methods: We included 240,234 Danish schoolchildren, born 1936 to 1989, with information on birth weight and measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between early life anthropometrics and ICH or SAH, identified through linkage with national registers.Results: During the study period, 1,947 individuals (39% women) experienced an ICH and 797 individuals (64% women) experienced a SAH. Per 500 g increase in birth weight, women had a 10% decreased risk of SAH (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97) and men had a 10% decreased risk of ICH (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.95). Birth weight was not associated with risks of ICH in women or SAH in men. In men, a childhood BMI below average (BMI z-score <0) was associated with increased risks of ICH. The association was stronger at older childhood ages, and at 13 years a BMI z-score of -1 was associated with a HR of 1.17 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.28), and a BMI z-score of -2 with a HR of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.82) for ICH. Childhood BMI was not associated with risks of ICH in women or with risks of SAH in both sexes.Conclusions: Early life body size is associated with ICH and SAH, and the associations differ by sex.

AB - Background and Purpose: As risk of hemorrhagic stroke may have early life origins, we investigated associations of birth weight and childhood body mass index (BMI) with adult intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) or subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).Methods: We included 240,234 Danish schoolchildren, born 1936 to 1989, with information on birth weight and measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for the associations between early life anthropometrics and ICH or SAH, identified through linkage with national registers.Results: During the study period, 1,947 individuals (39% women) experienced an ICH and 797 individuals (64% women) experienced a SAH. Per 500 g increase in birth weight, women had a 10% decreased risk of SAH (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97) and men had a 10% decreased risk of ICH (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.85 to 0.95). Birth weight was not associated with risks of ICH in women or SAH in men. In men, a childhood BMI below average (BMI z-score <0) was associated with increased risks of ICH. The association was stronger at older childhood ages, and at 13 years a BMI z-score of -1 was associated with a HR of 1.17 (95% CI, 1.06 to 1.28), and a BMI z-score of -2 with a HR of 1.46 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.82) for ICH. Childhood BMI was not associated with risks of ICH in women or with risks of SAH in both sexes.Conclusions: Early life body size is associated with ICH and SAH, and the associations differ by sex.

KW - Birth weight

KW - Body mass index

KW - Child

KW - Cohort studies

KW - Hemorrhage

KW - Stroke

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065331614&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.5853/jos.2018.02033

DO - 10.5853/jos.2018.02033

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 60

EP - 68

JO - Journal of Stroke

JF - Journal of Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 56106289