Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Rigshospitalet - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Dysphagia training after head and neck cancer fails to follow legislation and national recommendations

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. Danish expanded newborn screening is a successful preventive public health programme

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. Analgesics use and withdrawal in people with dementia - a register-based Danish study and a systematic review

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningpeer review

  3. Everolimus as adjunctive treatment in tuberous sclerosis complex-associated epilepsy in children

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Regional and socioeconomic variation in survival of melanoma patients in Denmark

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  1. PET/CT prior to salvage surgery in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  2. To eat is to practice-managing eating problems after head and neck cancer

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  3. Oral health-related quality of life, oral aesthetics and oral function in head and neck cancer patients after oral rehabilitation

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

  4. Adherence to preventive swallowing exercises for head and neck cancer patients undergoing (chemo)radiotherapy treatment

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningpeer review

Vis graf over relationer

INTRODUCTION: Dysphagia is a known sequela after head and neck cancer (HNC) and causes malnutrition, aspiration pneumonia and a reduced quality of life. Due to improved survival rates, the number of patients with sequelae is increasing. Evidence on the ideal HNC-specific rehabilitation of dysphagia is lacking, but several studies indicate that early initiation is crucial. The aim of this study was to map the existing dysphagia rehabilitation programmes for HNC patients in Denmark.

METHODS: Occupational therapists (OTs), oncologists and surgeons from five hospitals participated in a nationwide questionnaire-based survey, along with OTs from 39 municipal health centres.

RESULTS: HNC patients rarely receive preventive occupational therapy before treatment, and hospital-based OTs mainly attend to HNC patients undergoing surgery. Far from all oncology and surgical departments complete the required rehabilitation plans upon discharge which leaves many patients untreated. There are vast differences between the municipalities' rehabilitation programmes and between the expertise employed in municipalities and hospitals.

CONCLUSION: Existing HNC rehabilitation does not meet official Danish guidelines. Only a fraction of HNC patients are offered rehabilitation and often long after completing treatment. Municipal rehabilitation services vary considerably in terms of type, duration, intensity and expertise. Dysphagia-related rehabilitation requires an improved monitoration, possibly with an increase in the uptake of centralised dysphagia rehabilitation.

FUNDING: not relevant.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftDanish Medical Bulletin (Online)
Vol/bind62
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)A5067
ISSN1603-9629
StatusUdgivet - maj 2015

ID: 46012945