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Udgivet

Cyclosporine and COVID-19: Risk or favorable?

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewpeer review

DOI

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Vis graf over relationer

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is declared a global health emergency. COVID-19 is triggered by a novel coronavirus: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Baseline characteristics of admitted patients with COVID-19 show that adiposity, diabetes, and hypertension are risk factors for developing severe disease, but so far immunosuppressed patients who are listed as high-risk patients have not been more susceptible to severe COVID-19 than the rest of the population. Multiple clinical trials are currently being conducted, which may identify more drugs that can lower mortality, morbidity, and burden on the society. Several independent studies have convincingly shown that cyclosporine inhibit replication of several different coronaviruses in vitro. The cyclosporine-analog alisporivir has recently been shown to inhibit SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. These findings are intriguing, although there is no clinical evidence for a protective effect to reduce the likelihood of severe COVID-19 or to treat the immune storm or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that often causes severe morbidity. Here, we review the putative link between COVID-19 and cyclosporine, while we await more robust clinical data.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Vol/bind20
Udgave nummer11
Sider (fra-til)2975-2982
Antal sider8
ISSN1600-6135
DOI
StatusUdgivet - 1 nov. 2020

Bibliografisk note

© 2020 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

ID: 61066298