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Chronic rhinosinusitis in COPD: A prevalent but unrecognized comorbidity impacting health related quality of life

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Arndal, Elisabeth ; Sørensen, Anne Lyngholm ; Lapperre, Therese Sophie ; Said, Nihaya ; Trampedach, Charlotte ; Aanæs, Kasper ; Alanin, Mikkel Christian ; Christensen, Karl Bang ; Backer, Vibeke ; von Buchwald, Christian. / Chronic rhinosinusitis in COPD : A prevalent but unrecognized comorbidity impacting health related quality of life. I: Respiratory medicine. 2020 ; Bind 171. s. 106092.

Bibtex

@article{5fcabf2df416478d98bbfdd74541a198,
title = "Chronic rhinosinusitis in COPD: A prevalent but unrecognized comorbidity impacting health related quality of life",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: Unified airway disease where upper respiratory tract inflammation including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) affects lower airway disease is known from asthma, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia but little is known about CRS and health related quality of life in COPD. We investigate firstly, the prevalence of CRS in COPD. Secondly the impact of CRS on HRQoL. Thirdly, risk factors for CRS in COPD.METHODS: cross-sectional study of CRS in 222 COPD patients from 2017 to 2019 according to EPOS2012/2020 and GOLD2019 criteria. Patients completed the COPD assessment test (CAT), Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and Sinonasal outcome test 22 (SNOT22) and questions on CRS symptoms. They then had a physical examination including flexible nasal endoscopy, CT-sinus scan and HRCT-thorax.RESULTS: 22.5{\%} of COPD patients had CRS and 82{\%} of these were undiagnosed prior to the study. HRQoL (CAT, SNOT22 and the SNOT22-nasal symptom subscore) was significantly worse in COPD patients with CRS compared with those without CRS and healthy controls. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggests that the most likely candidate for having CRS was a male COPD patient who actively smoked, took inhaled steroids, had a high CAT and SNOT22_nasal symptom subscore.DISCUSSION: the largest clinical study of CRS in COPD and the only study diagnosing CRS according to EPOS and GOLD. This study supports unified airway disease in COPD. The SNOT22_nasal symptoms subscore is recommended as a standard questionnaire for COPD patients and patients at risk should be referred to an otorhinolaryngologist.",
keywords = "CAT, COPD, CRS, HRQoL, SNOT22, Unified airways",
author = "Elisabeth Arndal and S{\o}rensen, {Anne Lyngholm} and Lapperre, {Therese Sophie} and Nihaya Said and Charlotte Trampedach and Kasper Aan{\ae}s and Alanin, {Mikkel Christian} and Christensen, {Karl Bang} and Vibeke Backer and {von Buchwald}, Christian",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2020",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.rmed.2020.106092",
language = "English",
volume = "171",
pages = "106092",
journal = "Respiratory medicine",
issn = "0954-6111",
publisher = "W.B./Saunders Co. Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Chronic rhinosinusitis in COPD

T2 - A prevalent but unrecognized comorbidity impacting health related quality of life

AU - Arndal, Elisabeth

AU - Sørensen, Anne Lyngholm

AU - Lapperre, Therese Sophie

AU - Said, Nihaya

AU - Trampedach, Charlotte

AU - Aanæs, Kasper

AU - Alanin, Mikkel Christian

AU - Christensen, Karl Bang

AU - Backer, Vibeke

AU - von Buchwald, Christian

N1 - Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2020/9

Y1 - 2020/9

N2 - INTRODUCTION: Unified airway disease where upper respiratory tract inflammation including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) affects lower airway disease is known from asthma, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia but little is known about CRS and health related quality of life in COPD. We investigate firstly, the prevalence of CRS in COPD. Secondly the impact of CRS on HRQoL. Thirdly, risk factors for CRS in COPD.METHODS: cross-sectional study of CRS in 222 COPD patients from 2017 to 2019 according to EPOS2012/2020 and GOLD2019 criteria. Patients completed the COPD assessment test (CAT), Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and Sinonasal outcome test 22 (SNOT22) and questions on CRS symptoms. They then had a physical examination including flexible nasal endoscopy, CT-sinus scan and HRCT-thorax.RESULTS: 22.5% of COPD patients had CRS and 82% of these were undiagnosed prior to the study. HRQoL (CAT, SNOT22 and the SNOT22-nasal symptom subscore) was significantly worse in COPD patients with CRS compared with those without CRS and healthy controls. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggests that the most likely candidate for having CRS was a male COPD patient who actively smoked, took inhaled steroids, had a high CAT and SNOT22_nasal symptom subscore.DISCUSSION: the largest clinical study of CRS in COPD and the only study diagnosing CRS according to EPOS and GOLD. This study supports unified airway disease in COPD. The SNOT22_nasal symptoms subscore is recommended as a standard questionnaire for COPD patients and patients at risk should be referred to an otorhinolaryngologist.

AB - INTRODUCTION: Unified airway disease where upper respiratory tract inflammation including chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) affects lower airway disease is known from asthma, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia but little is known about CRS and health related quality of life in COPD. We investigate firstly, the prevalence of CRS in COPD. Secondly the impact of CRS on HRQoL. Thirdly, risk factors for CRS in COPD.METHODS: cross-sectional study of CRS in 222 COPD patients from 2017 to 2019 according to EPOS2012/2020 and GOLD2019 criteria. Patients completed the COPD assessment test (CAT), Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and Sinonasal outcome test 22 (SNOT22) and questions on CRS symptoms. They then had a physical examination including flexible nasal endoscopy, CT-sinus scan and HRCT-thorax.RESULTS: 22.5% of COPD patients had CRS and 82% of these were undiagnosed prior to the study. HRQoL (CAT, SNOT22 and the SNOT22-nasal symptom subscore) was significantly worse in COPD patients with CRS compared with those without CRS and healthy controls. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggests that the most likely candidate for having CRS was a male COPD patient who actively smoked, took inhaled steroids, had a high CAT and SNOT22_nasal symptom subscore.DISCUSSION: the largest clinical study of CRS in COPD and the only study diagnosing CRS according to EPOS and GOLD. This study supports unified airway disease in COPD. The SNOT22_nasal symptoms subscore is recommended as a standard questionnaire for COPD patients and patients at risk should be referred to an otorhinolaryngologist.

KW - CAT

KW - COPD

KW - CRS

KW - HRQoL

KW - SNOT22

KW - Unified airways

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85089689106&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.rmed.2020.106092

DO - 10.1016/j.rmed.2020.106092

M3 - Journal article

VL - 171

SP - 106092

JO - Respiratory medicine

JF - Respiratory medicine

SN - 0954-6111

M1 - 106092

ER -

ID: 60888611