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Region Hovedstadens Psykiatri - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
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Cerebrospinal fluid test results and associations with subsequent mental disorders, neurological diseases, and CNS infections: A population-based cohort study

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BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immune alterations have been associated with mental disorders, neurological disease, and CNS infections; however, comprehensive large-scale longitudinal CSF studies are lacking.

METHODS: By using the Clinical Laboratory Information System (LABKA) Research Database in the Central Denmark Region (1994-2012), we included 15,030 individuals tested for CSF WBC, CSF/serum albumin ratio, IgG index, total protein, albumin, or IgG with follow-up for the risk of mental disorders, psychotropic prescriptions, neurological diseases, or CNS infections, estimated by Cox regression.

RESULTS: Among individuals receiving a mental disorder diagnosis (N = 1,147) after a CSF test, 30·0% had an abnormal CSF test result, while for those with a neurological disease (N = 3,201), 39·9% had abnormal test results, and among individuals with CNS infections (N = 1,276), 73·0% had abnormal test results. Individuals with abnormal CSF test results had an increased risk of mental disorders (HR = 3·20; 95%CI = 2·86-3·59), neurological diseases (HR = 12·40; 95%CI = 11·65-13·20), and CNS infections (HR = 338·59; 95%CI = 299·06-383·35) compared to individuals not registered with a CSF test. However, the risk of mental disorders was higher (P < 0·001) after CSF test results within the normal range (HR = 4·45; 95%CI = 4·08-4·86), whereas for neurological diseases (HR = 9·72; 95%CI = 9·19-10·29) and CNS infections (HR = 55·17; 95%CI = 47·12-64·60), the risk was highest after abnormal CSF test results (all P < 0·001). The risk of organic mental disorders tended to be highest in individuals with abnormal CSF test results (HR = 19·30; 95%CI = 13·44-27·71) even though not significantly different from the risk in the group of individuals with CSF test results in the normal range (HR = 13·55; 95%CI = 9·36-19·60) (P ≥ 0·05). Abnormal CSF test results were associated with an elevated risk of psychotropic prescriptions (HR = 3·91; 95%CI = 3·66-4·18), as were CSF test results within the normal range (HR = 4·26; 95%CI = 4·03-4·51) (P < 0·05).

CONCLUSIONS: Immunological CSF abnormalities are associated with an increased risk of mental disorders, neurological disease, and particularly CNS infections; however, the included CSF parameters were not specific for mental disorders and the relevant CSF biomarkers in psychiatry are yet to be discovered.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftBrain, Behavior, and Immunity
Vol/bind98
Sider (fra-til)210-218
Antal sider9
ISSN0889-1591
DOI
StatusUdgivet - nov. 2021

Bibliografisk note

Copyright © 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

ID: 67571581