Forskning
Udskriv Udskriv
Switch language
Hvidovre Hospital - en del af Københavns Universitetshospital
Udgivet

Socioeconomic inequalities in breast cancer incidence and mortality in Europe-a systematic review and meta-analysis

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelpeer review

DOI

  1. Colorectal cancer in adolescents and young adults with Lynch syndrome: a Danish register-based study

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelpeer review

  2. Lynch syndrome-associated epithelial ovarian cancer and its immunological profile

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelpeer review

  3. Timely treatment initiation; a reminder about effort to reduce system-related lead times

    Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLederpeer review

  • Adam Lundqvist
  • Emelie Andersson
  • Ida Ahlberg
  • Mef Nilbert
  • Ulf Gerdtham
Vis graf over relationer

BACKGROUND: Breast cancer is the leading cause of female cancer in Europe and is estimated to affect more than one in 10 women. Higher socioeconomic status has been linked to higher incidence but lower case fatality, while the impact on mortality is ambiguous.

METHODS: We performed a systematic literature review and meta-analysis on studies on association between socioeconomic status and breast cancer outcomes in Europe, with a focus on effects of confounding factors. Summary relative risks (SRRs) were calculated.

RESULTS: The systematic review included 25 articles of which 8 studied incidence, 10 case fatality and 8 mortality. The meta-analysis showed a significantly increased incidence (SRR 1.25, 1.17-1.32), a significantly decreased case fatality (SRR 0.72, 0.63-0.81) and a significantly increased mortality (SRR 1.16, 1.10-1.23) for women with higher socioeconomic status. The association for incidence became insignificant when reproductive factors were included. Case fatality remained significant after controlling for tumour characteristics, treatment factors, comorbidity and lifestyle factors. Mortality remained significant after controlling for reproductive factors.

CONCLUSION: Women with higher socioeconomic status show significantly higher breast cancer incidence, which may be explained by reproductive factors, mammography screening, hormone replacement therapy and lifestyle factors. Lower case fatality for women with higher socioeconomic status may be partly explained by differences in tumour characteristics, treatment factors, comorbidity and lifestyle factors. Several factors linked to breast cancer risk and outcome, such as lower screening attendance for women with lower socioeconomic status, are suitable targets for policy intervention aimed at reducing socioeconomic-related inequalities in health outcomes.

OriginalsprogEngelsk
TidsskriftEuropean Journal of Public Health
Vol/bind26
Udgave nummer5
Sider (fra-til)804-813
Antal sider10
ISSN1101-1262
DOI
StatusUdgivet - okt. 2016

ID: 49798446