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Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelpeer review

Harvard

Opel, N, Narr, KL, Abbott, C, Argyelan, M, Espinoza, R, Emsell, L, Bouckaert, F, Sienaert, P, Vandenbulcke, M, Nordanskog, P, Repple, J, Kavakbasi, E, Jorgensen, MB, Paulson, OB, Hanson, LG, Dols, A, van Exel, E, Oudega, ML, Takamiya, A, Kishimoto, T, Ousdal, OT, Haavik, J, Hammar, Å, Oedegaard, KJ, Kessler, U, Bartsch, H, Dale, AM, Baune, BT, Dannlowski, U, Oltedal, L & Redlich, R 2021, 'Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy', Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN, bind 46, nr. 4, 200176, s. E418-E426. https://doi.org/10.1503/jpn.200176

APA

Opel, N., Narr, K. L., Abbott, C., Argyelan, M., Espinoza, R., Emsell, L., Bouckaert, F., Sienaert, P., Vandenbulcke, M., Nordanskog, P., Repple, J., Kavakbasi, E., Jorgensen, M. B., Paulson, O. B., Hanson, L. G., Dols, A., van Exel, E., Oudega, M. L., Takamiya, A., ... Redlich, R. (2021). Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy. Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN, 46(4), E418-E426. [200176]. https://doi.org/10.1503/jpn.200176

CBE

Opel N, Narr KL, Abbott C, Argyelan M, Espinoza R, Emsell L, Bouckaert F, Sienaert P, Vandenbulcke M, Nordanskog P, Repple J, Kavakbasi E, Jorgensen MB, Paulson OB, Hanson LG, Dols A, van Exel E, Oudega ML, Takamiya A, Kishimoto T, Ousdal OT, Haavik J, Hammar Å, Oedegaard KJ, Kessler U, Bartsch H, Dale AM, Baune BT, Dannlowski U, Oltedal L, Redlich R. 2021. Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy. Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN. 46(4):E418-E426. https://doi.org/10.1503/jpn.200176

MLA

Vancouver

Author

Opel, Nils ; Narr, Katherine L. ; Abbott, Christopher ; Argyelan, Miklos ; Espinoza, Randall ; Emsell, Louise ; Bouckaert, Filip ; Sienaert, Pascal ; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu ; Nordanskog, Pia ; Repple, Jonathan ; Kavakbasi, Erhan ; Jorgensen, Martin B. ; Paulson, Olaf B. ; Hanson, Lars G. ; Dols, Annemieke ; van Exel, Eric ; Oudega, Mardien L. ; Takamiya, Akihiro ; Kishimoto, Taishiro ; Ousdal, Olga Therese ; Haavik, Jan ; Hammar, Åsa ; Oedegaard, Ketil Joachim ; Kessler, Ute ; Bartsch, Hauke ; Dale, Anders M. ; Baune, Bernhard T. ; Dannlowski, Udo ; Oltedal, Leif ; Redlich, Ronny. / Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy. I: Journal of psychiatry & neuroscience : JPN. 2021 ; Bind 46, Nr. 4. s. E418-E426.

Bibtex

@article{4e3747017a0b4cdaa3dc65d19822b2f3,
title = "Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy",
abstract = "Background: Obesity is a frequent somatic comorbidity of major depression, and it has been associated with worse clinical outcomes and brain structural abnormalities. Converging evidence suggests that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces both clinical improvements and increased subcortical grey matter volume in patients with depression. However, it remains unknown whether increased body weight modulates the clinical response and structural neuroplasticity that occur with ECT.Methods: To address this question, we conducted a longitudinal investigation of structural MRI data from the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) in 223 patients who were experiencing a major depressive episode (10 scanning sites). Structural MRI data were acquired before and after ECT, and we assessed change in subcortical grey matter volume using FreeSurfer and Quarc.Results: Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with a significantly lower increase in subcortical grey matter volume following ECT. We observed significant negative associations between BMI and change in subcortical grey matter volume, with pronounced effects in the thalamus and putamen, where obese participants showed increases in grey matter volume that were 43.3% and 49.6%, respectively, of the increases found in participants with normal weight. As well, BMI significantly moderated the association between subcortical grey matter volume change and clinical response to ECT. We observed no significant association between BMI and clinical response to ECT.Limitations: Because only baseline BMI values were available, we were unable to study BMI changes during ECT and their potential association with clinical and grey matter volume change.Conclusion: Future studies should take into account the relevance of body weight as a modulator of structural neuroplasticity during ECT treatment and aim to further explore the functional relevance of this novel finding.",
author = "Nils Opel and Narr, {Katherine L.} and Christopher Abbott and Miklos Argyelan and Randall Espinoza and Louise Emsell and Filip Bouckaert and Pascal Sienaert and Mathieu Vandenbulcke and Pia Nordanskog and Jonathan Repple and Erhan Kavakbasi and Jorgensen, {Martin B.} and Paulson, {Olaf B.} and Hanson, {Lars G.} and Annemieke Dols and {van Exel}, Eric and Oudega, {Mardien L.} and Akihiro Takamiya and Taishiro Kishimoto and Ousdal, {Olga Therese} and Jan Haavik and {\AA}sa Hammar and Oedegaard, {Ketil Joachim} and Ute Kessler and Hauke Bartsch and Dale, {Anders M.} and Baune, {Bernhard T.} and Udo Dannlowski and Leif Oltedal and Ronny Redlich",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 CMA Joule Inc. or its licensors.",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
day = "5",
doi = "10.1503/jpn.200176",
language = "English",
volume = "46",
pages = "E418--E426",
journal = "Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience",
issn = "1180-4882",
publisher = "Canadian Medical Association",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Elevated body weight modulates subcortical volume change and associated clinical response following electroconvulsive therapy

AU - Opel, Nils

AU - Narr, Katherine L.

AU - Abbott, Christopher

AU - Argyelan, Miklos

AU - Espinoza, Randall

AU - Emsell, Louise

AU - Bouckaert, Filip

AU - Sienaert, Pascal

AU - Vandenbulcke, Mathieu

AU - Nordanskog, Pia

AU - Repple, Jonathan

AU - Kavakbasi, Erhan

AU - Jorgensen, Martin B.

AU - Paulson, Olaf B.

AU - Hanson, Lars G.

AU - Dols, Annemieke

AU - van Exel, Eric

AU - Oudega, Mardien L.

AU - Takamiya, Akihiro

AU - Kishimoto, Taishiro

AU - Ousdal, Olga Therese

AU - Haavik, Jan

AU - Hammar, Åsa

AU - Oedegaard, Ketil Joachim

AU - Kessler, Ute

AU - Bartsch, Hauke

AU - Dale, Anders M.

AU - Baune, Bernhard T.

AU - Dannlowski, Udo

AU - Oltedal, Leif

AU - Redlich, Ronny

N1 - © 2021 CMA Joule Inc. or its licensors.

PY - 2021/7/5

Y1 - 2021/7/5

N2 - Background: Obesity is a frequent somatic comorbidity of major depression, and it has been associated with worse clinical outcomes and brain structural abnormalities. Converging evidence suggests that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces both clinical improvements and increased subcortical grey matter volume in patients with depression. However, it remains unknown whether increased body weight modulates the clinical response and structural neuroplasticity that occur with ECT.Methods: To address this question, we conducted a longitudinal investigation of structural MRI data from the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) in 223 patients who were experiencing a major depressive episode (10 scanning sites). Structural MRI data were acquired before and after ECT, and we assessed change in subcortical grey matter volume using FreeSurfer and Quarc.Results: Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with a significantly lower increase in subcortical grey matter volume following ECT. We observed significant negative associations between BMI and change in subcortical grey matter volume, with pronounced effects in the thalamus and putamen, where obese participants showed increases in grey matter volume that were 43.3% and 49.6%, respectively, of the increases found in participants with normal weight. As well, BMI significantly moderated the association between subcortical grey matter volume change and clinical response to ECT. We observed no significant association between BMI and clinical response to ECT.Limitations: Because only baseline BMI values were available, we were unable to study BMI changes during ECT and their potential association with clinical and grey matter volume change.Conclusion: Future studies should take into account the relevance of body weight as a modulator of structural neuroplasticity during ECT treatment and aim to further explore the functional relevance of this novel finding.

AB - Background: Obesity is a frequent somatic comorbidity of major depression, and it has been associated with worse clinical outcomes and brain structural abnormalities. Converging evidence suggests that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) induces both clinical improvements and increased subcortical grey matter volume in patients with depression. However, it remains unknown whether increased body weight modulates the clinical response and structural neuroplasticity that occur with ECT.Methods: To address this question, we conducted a longitudinal investigation of structural MRI data from the Global ECT-MRI Research Collaboration (GEMRIC) in 223 patients who were experiencing a major depressive episode (10 scanning sites). Structural MRI data were acquired before and after ECT, and we assessed change in subcortical grey matter volume using FreeSurfer and Quarc.Results: Higher body mass index (BMI) was associated with a significantly lower increase in subcortical grey matter volume following ECT. We observed significant negative associations between BMI and change in subcortical grey matter volume, with pronounced effects in the thalamus and putamen, where obese participants showed increases in grey matter volume that were 43.3% and 49.6%, respectively, of the increases found in participants with normal weight. As well, BMI significantly moderated the association between subcortical grey matter volume change and clinical response to ECT. We observed no significant association between BMI and clinical response to ECT.Limitations: Because only baseline BMI values were available, we were unable to study BMI changes during ECT and their potential association with clinical and grey matter volume change.Conclusion: Future studies should take into account the relevance of body weight as a modulator of structural neuroplasticity during ECT treatment and aim to further explore the functional relevance of this novel finding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85110846507&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1503/jpn.200176

DO - 10.1503/jpn.200176

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34223741

VL - 46

SP - E418-E426

JO - Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience

SN - 1180-4882

IS - 4

M1 - 200176

ER -

ID: 67561580