Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Youth friendly communication in a transition clinic aimed at adolescents with chronic illness

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Is HEADS in our heads? Health risk behavior is not routinely discussed with young people with chronic conditions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Feasibility of a transition intervention aimed at adolescents with chronic illness

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Polygenic risk score-analysis of thromboembolism in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Management of Asparaginase Toxicity in AYAs with ALL

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Smartphone App to Self-Monitor Nausea During Pediatric Chemotherapy Treatment: User-Centered Design Process

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Dyslipidemia at diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Background Good communication skills are considered a cornerstone in a "youth friendly approach". However, research in the field as well as transition guidelines only sparsely explain what doctor-patient communication involves. Furthermore, only few guidelines exist regarding concrete communication skills for health professionals who want to apply a youth friendly communication approach to their practice. Objective To examine how health professionals trained in adolescent medicine practise a youth friendly approach when communicating with adolescents with chronic illness. Methods Data from 10 non-participation observations of transition consultations with adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were analysed using a qualitative positioning analysis approach focusing on the health professionals' reflexive and interactive positionings as well as the décor of the consultation room. Results The health professionals in the transition clinic positioned the adolescent patients as independent interlocutors, children, and adolescents, and they positioned themselves as imperfect/untraditional, appreciative and non-judgmental. The positionings were based on a number of linguistic tools such as affirmation, recognition, examples, asking for the adolescents' own expert knowledge and the décor. The health professionals actively negotiated power. Conclusion Positionings and linguistic tools were inspired by youth friendly tools including the HEADS (Home Education/Eating Activities Drugs Sex/Safety/Self harm) interview, motivational interviewing, and an adolescent medicine practice. A central component was negotiating of power. Limitations of the study include a risk of too positive interpretations of data, i.e. because of the presence of the observer, who could have affected the health professionals' positionings.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20170083
JournalInternational Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
Volume32
Issue number1
Number of pages10
ISSN0334-0139
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

    Research areas

  • Journal Article, chronic illness, positioning, communication, transition, youth friendly

ID: 52168238