Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

Would you like to purchase a rodent with dermatophytes?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

DOI

  1. Differences in epidemiology of candidaemia in the Nordic countries - what is to blame?

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Black yeast-like fungi in skin and nail: it probably matters

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  1. Causative exposures and temporal development of cobalt allergy in Denmark between 2002 and 2017

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Patch test reactivity to aluminium chambers

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Cohort profile: the clinical 'Psoriasis in Adolescents' (PIA) cohort in Denmark

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Inter-rater agreement and reliability of outcome measurement instruments and staging systems used in hidradenitis suppurativa

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

The zoophilic dermatophyte Trichophyton benhamiae has received attention due to increasing infections in human in recent years. Trichophyton benhamiae has been found on asymptomatic rodents from pet shops in several countries posing a potential risk for transmission to humans. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of positive dermatophyte cultures from rodents in Danish pet shops in order to clarify the magnitude of potential sources of zoophilic infections and to prevent further spread. Specimen sampling was performed in 17 Danish pet shops using the brush technique (MacKenzie technique). After incubation, cultures were sent to ITS DNA sequencing for molecular species identification. Pet shop employees were asked to fulfil a five-question survey regarding purchase and procedures of diseased animals. A total of 98 animals were sampled (N = 32 rabbits, N = 32 guinea pigs and N = 34 hamsters). Trichophyton benhamiae was found in 14/98 samples (14%); 12/32 guinea pigs (38%) were positive with T benhamiae, 2/34 (6%) hamsters and 0/32 rabbits (0%). We found that hamsters and particularly guinea pigs from Danish pet shops are common asymptomatic carriers of the dermatophyte T benhamiae. Although a larger study is warranted to test this postulate, and it raises the question if infection control measures should be implemented in pet shops.

Original languageEnglish
JournalMycoses
Volume62
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)584-587
Number of pages4
ISSN0933-7407
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2019

ID: 57774984