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Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

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@article{a994a17d06b4474f91c44291bb1408e6,
title = "Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion",
abstract = "In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response.",
author = "Teit Mantoni and Rasmussen, {Jakob H{\o}jlund} and Bo Belhage and Pott, {Frank Christian}",
year = "2008",
month = aug,
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "79",
pages = "765--8",
journal = "Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "0095-6562",
publisher = "Aerospace Medical Association",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

AU - Mantoni, Teit

AU - Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund

AU - Belhage, Bo

AU - Pott, Frank Christian

PY - 2008/8/1

Y1 - 2008/8/1

N2 - In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response.

AB - In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires several cold immersions. This study examines whether thorough instruction enables non-habituated persons to attenuate the ventilatory component of cold-shock response.

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18717115

VL - 79

SP - 765

EP - 768

JO - Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine

JF - Aviation Space and Environmental Medicine

SN - 0095-6562

IS - 8

ER -

ID: 32358201