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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Vitamin D: should the supply in the Danish population be increased?

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A working group was established to evaluate the need for an increased vitamin D intake in the Danish population. Vitamin D is primarily important for calcium homeostasis, calcium absorption in the intestine and calcium content in bones, and thereby for the strength of the bones. Only a few foods provide vitamin D and the intake in the Danish population is low compared to the recommendation. However, vitamin D is also produced by the skin from solar exposure. How much vitamin D is provided this way is not known but it is said to be the most important source. Measures of vitamin D status and clinical signs of vitamin D status are therefore important when assessing the possible need for increased vitamin D intake. Measures of vitamin D status have shown a low status in the elderly but not in the young. More than 50% of nursing-home residents have low blood vitamin D levels and many have biochemical signs of osteomalacia. Vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of osteoporosis. In Denmark, for instance, 13,000 admissions each year are caused by hip fractures alone, almost all among elderly people. Dark-skinned women often constitute a problem with respect to vitamin D sufficiency because of reduced production from the skin secondary to extensive covering, skin pigmentation and many hours spent indoors. It is concluded that the elderly and dark-skinned (veiled) women will benefit from an increased vitamin D supply. Four strategies to increase vitamin D supply were considered: dietary changes, increased solar exposure, dietary supplements with vitamin D and food fortification with vitamin D. It is concluded that the best solution is to recommend dietary supplements with vitamin D to elderly over 65 years, dark-skinned and veiled women and people who, because of disease, are unable to spend time outdoors.

Original languageEnglish
JournalScandinavian Journal of Food and Nutrition
Volume51
Issue number3
Pages (from-to)209-15
Number of pages7
ISSN0963-7486
Publication statusPublished - May 2000

    Research areas

  • Age Factors, Culture, Denmark/epidemiology, Female, Heliotherapy, Humans, Male, Nutrition Policy, Risk Factors, Vitamin D/administration & dosage, Vitamin D Deficiency/epidemiology

ID: 57327940