Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Valve regurgitation in patients surviving endocarditis and the subsequent risk of heart failure

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Interaction of ischaemic postconditioning and thrombectomy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Outcome after heart-lung or lung transplantation in patients with Eisenmenger syndrome

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Clinical implications of electrocardiographic bundle branch block in primary care

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Prevalence of heart failure and other risk factors among first-degree relatives of women with peripartum cardiomyopathy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Sexual rehabilitation for cardiac patients with erectile dysfunction: a randomised clinical trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

BACKGROUND: Significant valve regurgitation is common in patients surviving native valve infective endocarditis (IE), however the associated risk of heart failure (HF) subsequent to hospital discharge after IE is sparsely described.

METHODS: We linked data from the East Danish Endocarditis Registry with administrative registries from 2002 to 2016 and included patients treated medically for IE who were discharged alive. Left-sided valve regurgitation was assessed by echocardiography at IE discharge and examined for longitudinal risk of HF. Multivariable adjusted Cox analysis was used to assess the associated risk of HF in patients with regurgitation (moderate or severe) compared with patients without regurgitation.

RESULTS: We included 192 patients, 87 patients with regurgitation at discharge (30 with aortic regurgitation and 57 with mitral regurgitation) and 105 patients without. The cumulative risk of HF at 5 years of follow-up was 28.7% in patients with regurgitation at IE discharge and 12.4% in patients without regurgitation; the corresponding multivariable adjusted HR was 3.53 (95% CI 1.72 to 7.25). We identified an increased associated risk of HF for patients with aortic regurgitation (HR=2.91, 95% CI 1.14 to 7.43) and mitral regurgitation (HR=3.95, 95% CI 1.80 to 8.67) compared with patients without regurgitation. During follow-up, 21.9% and 5.7% underwent left-sided valve surgery among patients with and without regurgitation.

CONCLUSION: In patients surviving IE, treated medically, we observed that severe or moderate left-sided native valve regurgitation was associated with a significantly higher risk of HF compared with patients without regurgitation at IE discharge. Close monitoring of these patients is needed to initiate surgery timely.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere19315715
JournalHeart (British Cardiac Society)
ISSN1355-6037
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 10 Dec 2019

    Research areas

  • Aortic regurgitation, Cardiac surgery, Endocarditis, Heart failure, Mitral regurgitation

ID: 58597044