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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Values and control in type 1 diabetes beyond glycemic outcomes: A qualitative interview study of everyday life with an insulin pump

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@article{d656ec9b9ef9452581ab0dac6ccaf294,
title = "Values and control in type 1 diabetes beyond glycemic outcomes: A qualitative interview study of everyday life with an insulin pump",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: Diabetes technology provides people with diabetes with new opportunities, but the transformations allowed by new technology do not necessarily provide improvements in clinical metrics applied in diabetes care. This study seeks to understand how everyday life impacts on the way people use diabetes technology and how this influences diabetes care.METHODS: Individual semi-structured qualitative interviews with 21 adults with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pumps were recruited from two Danish diabetes outpatient clinics. Data were analyzed abductively and interpreted according to predetermined and emergent perspectives.RESULTS: Transformations in care practices derived from new technological therapies were generally well-supported by healthcare providers, but adaptation to everyday life was often challenging. More advanced technology enabled people to better control diabetes, but the control they sought was defined by individual life experiences/factors. Work involved in controlling blood glucose could cause a sense of feeling controlled by diabetes in everyday life.DISCUSSION: Everyday life with diabetes is often characterized by uncertainty and individual coping strategies are imbued with values that extend beyond purely clinical concerns and reflect the sociality of everyday life. The social values influencing individual decision-making regarding diabetes technology could be effectively expanded and enhanced with integrated peer-supported learning.",
keywords = "Type 1 diabetes, everyday life, insulin pumps, peer-supported learning, qualitative interviews",
author = "Bryan Cleal and Nex{\o}, {Mette Andersen} and Signe Schmidt and Karen Rytter and Kirsten N{\o}rgaard and Ingrid Willaing",
year = "2021",
month = jun,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1177/17423953211023962",
language = "English",
pages = "17423953211023962",
journal = "Chronic Illness",
issn = "1742-3953",
publisher = "Sage Publications Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Values and control in type 1 diabetes beyond glycemic outcomes

T2 - A qualitative interview study of everyday life with an insulin pump

AU - Cleal, Bryan

AU - Nexø, Mette Andersen

AU - Schmidt, Signe

AU - Rytter, Karen

AU - Nørgaard, Kirsten

AU - Willaing, Ingrid

PY - 2021/6/23

Y1 - 2021/6/23

N2 - OBJECTIVES: Diabetes technology provides people with diabetes with new opportunities, but the transformations allowed by new technology do not necessarily provide improvements in clinical metrics applied in diabetes care. This study seeks to understand how everyday life impacts on the way people use diabetes technology and how this influences diabetes care.METHODS: Individual semi-structured qualitative interviews with 21 adults with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pumps were recruited from two Danish diabetes outpatient clinics. Data were analyzed abductively and interpreted according to predetermined and emergent perspectives.RESULTS: Transformations in care practices derived from new technological therapies were generally well-supported by healthcare providers, but adaptation to everyday life was often challenging. More advanced technology enabled people to better control diabetes, but the control they sought was defined by individual life experiences/factors. Work involved in controlling blood glucose could cause a sense of feeling controlled by diabetes in everyday life.DISCUSSION: Everyday life with diabetes is often characterized by uncertainty and individual coping strategies are imbued with values that extend beyond purely clinical concerns and reflect the sociality of everyday life. The social values influencing individual decision-making regarding diabetes technology could be effectively expanded and enhanced with integrated peer-supported learning.

AB - OBJECTIVES: Diabetes technology provides people with diabetes with new opportunities, but the transformations allowed by new technology do not necessarily provide improvements in clinical metrics applied in diabetes care. This study seeks to understand how everyday life impacts on the way people use diabetes technology and how this influences diabetes care.METHODS: Individual semi-structured qualitative interviews with 21 adults with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pumps were recruited from two Danish diabetes outpatient clinics. Data were analyzed abductively and interpreted according to predetermined and emergent perspectives.RESULTS: Transformations in care practices derived from new technological therapies were generally well-supported by healthcare providers, but adaptation to everyday life was often challenging. More advanced technology enabled people to better control diabetes, but the control they sought was defined by individual life experiences/factors. Work involved in controlling blood glucose could cause a sense of feeling controlled by diabetes in everyday life.DISCUSSION: Everyday life with diabetes is often characterized by uncertainty and individual coping strategies are imbued with values that extend beyond purely clinical concerns and reflect the sociality of everyday life. The social values influencing individual decision-making regarding diabetes technology could be effectively expanded and enhanced with integrated peer-supported learning.

KW - Type 1 diabetes

KW - everyday life

KW - insulin pumps

KW - peer-supported learning

KW - qualitative interviews

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85108784232&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/17423953211023962

DO - 10.1177/17423953211023962

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34162271

SP - 17423953211023962

JO - Chronic Illness

JF - Chronic Illness

SN - 1742-3953

ER -

ID: 67637670