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Vagotomy and the risk of mental disorders: A nationwide population-based study

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@article{b694199f6df64c91b495856d39623d82,
title = "Vagotomy and the risk of mental disorders: A nationwide population-based study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate vagotomy, the severance of the vagus nerve, and its association with mental disorders, as gut-brain communication partly mediated by the vagus nerve have been suggested as a risk factor.METHODS: Nationwide population-based Danish register study of all individuals alive and living in Denmark during the study period 1977-2016 and who had a hospital contact for ulcer with or without vagotomy. Follow-up was until any diagnosis of mental disorders requiring hospital contact, emigration, death, or end of follow-up on December 31, 2016, whichever came first. Data were analyzed using survival analysis and adjusted for sex, age, calendar year, ulcer type, and Charlson comorbidity index score.RESULTS: During the study period, 113,086 individuals had a hospital contact for ulcer. Of these, 5,408 were exposed to vagotomy where 375 (6.9%) subsequently developed a mental disorder. Vagotomy overall was not associated with mental disorders (HR: 1.10; 95%CI: 0.99-1.23), compared to individuals with ulcer not exposed to vagotomy. However, truncal vagotomy was associated with an increased HR of 1.22 (95%CI: 1.06-1.41) for mental disorders, whereas highly selective vagotomy was not associated with mental disorders (HR: 0.98; 95%CI: 0.84-1.15). Truncal vagotomy was also associated with higher risk of mental disorders when compared to highly selective vagotomy (p = 0.034).CONCLUSIONS: Overall, vagotomy did not increase the risk of mental disorders; however, truncal vagotomy specifically was associated with a small risk increase in mental disorders, whereas no association was found for highly selective vagotomy. Thus, the vagus nerve does not seem to have a major impact on the development of mental disorders.",
keywords = "immunology, inflammation, mental disorders, vagotomy, vagus nerve",
author = "Bunyoz, {Artemis H} and Christensen, {Rune H B} and Sonja Orlovska-Waast and Merete Nordentoft and Mortensen, {Preben B} and Petersen, {Liselotte V} and Benros, {Michael E}",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2021 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2021",
month = jul,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/acps.13343",
language = "English",
journal = "Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica",
issn = "0001-690X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vagotomy and the risk of mental disorders

T2 - A nationwide population-based study

AU - Bunyoz, Artemis H

AU - Christensen, Rune H B

AU - Orlovska-Waast, Sonja

AU - Nordentoft, Merete

AU - Mortensen, Preben B

AU - Petersen, Liselotte V

AU - Benros, Michael E

N1 - © 2021 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2021/7/1

Y1 - 2021/7/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate vagotomy, the severance of the vagus nerve, and its association with mental disorders, as gut-brain communication partly mediated by the vagus nerve have been suggested as a risk factor.METHODS: Nationwide population-based Danish register study of all individuals alive and living in Denmark during the study period 1977-2016 and who had a hospital contact for ulcer with or without vagotomy. Follow-up was until any diagnosis of mental disorders requiring hospital contact, emigration, death, or end of follow-up on December 31, 2016, whichever came first. Data were analyzed using survival analysis and adjusted for sex, age, calendar year, ulcer type, and Charlson comorbidity index score.RESULTS: During the study period, 113,086 individuals had a hospital contact for ulcer. Of these, 5,408 were exposed to vagotomy where 375 (6.9%) subsequently developed a mental disorder. Vagotomy overall was not associated with mental disorders (HR: 1.10; 95%CI: 0.99-1.23), compared to individuals with ulcer not exposed to vagotomy. However, truncal vagotomy was associated with an increased HR of 1.22 (95%CI: 1.06-1.41) for mental disorders, whereas highly selective vagotomy was not associated with mental disorders (HR: 0.98; 95%CI: 0.84-1.15). Truncal vagotomy was also associated with higher risk of mental disorders when compared to highly selective vagotomy (p = 0.034).CONCLUSIONS: Overall, vagotomy did not increase the risk of mental disorders; however, truncal vagotomy specifically was associated with a small risk increase in mental disorders, whereas no association was found for highly selective vagotomy. Thus, the vagus nerve does not seem to have a major impact on the development of mental disorders.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate vagotomy, the severance of the vagus nerve, and its association with mental disorders, as gut-brain communication partly mediated by the vagus nerve have been suggested as a risk factor.METHODS: Nationwide population-based Danish register study of all individuals alive and living in Denmark during the study period 1977-2016 and who had a hospital contact for ulcer with or without vagotomy. Follow-up was until any diagnosis of mental disorders requiring hospital contact, emigration, death, or end of follow-up on December 31, 2016, whichever came first. Data were analyzed using survival analysis and adjusted for sex, age, calendar year, ulcer type, and Charlson comorbidity index score.RESULTS: During the study period, 113,086 individuals had a hospital contact for ulcer. Of these, 5,408 were exposed to vagotomy where 375 (6.9%) subsequently developed a mental disorder. Vagotomy overall was not associated with mental disorders (HR: 1.10; 95%CI: 0.99-1.23), compared to individuals with ulcer not exposed to vagotomy. However, truncal vagotomy was associated with an increased HR of 1.22 (95%CI: 1.06-1.41) for mental disorders, whereas highly selective vagotomy was not associated with mental disorders (HR: 0.98; 95%CI: 0.84-1.15). Truncal vagotomy was also associated with higher risk of mental disorders when compared to highly selective vagotomy (p = 0.034).CONCLUSIONS: Overall, vagotomy did not increase the risk of mental disorders; however, truncal vagotomy specifically was associated with a small risk increase in mental disorders, whereas no association was found for highly selective vagotomy. Thus, the vagus nerve does not seem to have a major impact on the development of mental disorders.

KW - immunology

KW - inflammation

KW - mental disorders

KW - vagotomy

KW - vagus nerve

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85109632897&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/acps.13343

DO - 10.1111/acps.13343

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 34195992

JO - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

JF - Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

SN - 0001-690X

ER -

ID: 67571251