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Type 2 diabetes remission one year after an intensive lifestyle intervention: A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial

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@article{5050a2c525134602a841a52a9fa4f830,
title = "Type 2 diabetes remission one year after an intensive lifestyle intervention: A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial",
abstract = "AIMS: To investigate whether intensive lifestyle intervention induce partial or complete type 2 diabetes (T2D) remission.MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a secondary analysis of a randomized, assessor-blinded, single-center trial, patients with non-insulin dependent T2D (duration<10 years), were randomly assigned (2:1, stratified by sex, from April 2015 to August 2016) to a lifestyle intervention group (n=64) or a standard care group (n=34). The primary outcome was partial or complete T2D remission defined as non-diabetic glycemia with no glucose-lowering medications at the outcome assessments at both 12- and 24-months from baseline. All participants received standard care with a standardized, blinded, target-driven medical therapy during the initial 12-months. The lifestyle intervention moreover included 5-6 weekly aerobic and combined aerobic and strength training sessions (30-60 min) and individual dietary plans aiming for BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2 . No intervention was provided during the 12 months follow-up period.RESULTS: Among 98 randomized participants, 93 (mean [SD] age, 54.6 [8.9] years; 46 [43{\%}] women; mean [SD] baseline HbA1c 49.3 [9.3] mmol/mol) completed follow-up. At follow-up, 23{\%}(14) in the intervention and 7{\%}(2) in the standard care group met the criteria for any T2D remission (odds ratio (OR) [95{\%} CI] 4.4 [0.8 to 21.4], p=0.08). Assuming participants lost-to-follow-up (N=5) had relapsed, the OR [95{\%} CI] for T2D remission was 4.4 [1.0 to 19.8] (p=0.048).CONCLUSIONS: The statistically non-significant three-fold increased remission rate of T2D in the lifestyle intervention group calls for further large-scale studies to understand how to implement sustainable lifestyle interventions in T2D.STUDY REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov registration (NCT02417012). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
author = "Mathias Ried-Larsen and Johansen, {Mette Y} and MacDonald, {Christopher S} and Hansen, {Katrine B} and Robin Christensen and Anne-Sophie Wedell-Neergaard and Pilmark, {Nanna Skytt} and Henning Langberg and Vaag, {Allan A} and Pedersen, {Bente K} and Kristian Karstoft",
note = "{\circledC} 2019 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1111/dom.13802",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "2257--2266",
journal = "Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism",
issn = "1462-8902",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Type 2 diabetes remission one year after an intensive lifestyle intervention

T2 - A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial

AU - Ried-Larsen, Mathias

AU - Johansen, Mette Y

AU - MacDonald, Christopher S

AU - Hansen, Katrine B

AU - Christensen, Robin

AU - Wedell-Neergaard, Anne-Sophie

AU - Pilmark, Nanna Skytt

AU - Langberg, Henning

AU - Vaag, Allan A

AU - Pedersen, Bente K

AU - Karstoft, Kristian

N1 - © 2019 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2019/10

Y1 - 2019/10

N2 - AIMS: To investigate whether intensive lifestyle intervention induce partial or complete type 2 diabetes (T2D) remission.MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a secondary analysis of a randomized, assessor-blinded, single-center trial, patients with non-insulin dependent T2D (duration<10 years), were randomly assigned (2:1, stratified by sex, from April 2015 to August 2016) to a lifestyle intervention group (n=64) or a standard care group (n=34). The primary outcome was partial or complete T2D remission defined as non-diabetic glycemia with no glucose-lowering medications at the outcome assessments at both 12- and 24-months from baseline. All participants received standard care with a standardized, blinded, target-driven medical therapy during the initial 12-months. The lifestyle intervention moreover included 5-6 weekly aerobic and combined aerobic and strength training sessions (30-60 min) and individual dietary plans aiming for BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2 . No intervention was provided during the 12 months follow-up period.RESULTS: Among 98 randomized participants, 93 (mean [SD] age, 54.6 [8.9] years; 46 [43%] women; mean [SD] baseline HbA1c 49.3 [9.3] mmol/mol) completed follow-up. At follow-up, 23%(14) in the intervention and 7%(2) in the standard care group met the criteria for any T2D remission (odds ratio (OR) [95% CI] 4.4 [0.8 to 21.4], p=0.08). Assuming participants lost-to-follow-up (N=5) had relapsed, the OR [95% CI] for T2D remission was 4.4 [1.0 to 19.8] (p=0.048).CONCLUSIONS: The statistically non-significant three-fold increased remission rate of T2D in the lifestyle intervention group calls for further large-scale studies to understand how to implement sustainable lifestyle interventions in T2D.STUDY REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov registration (NCT02417012). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

AB - AIMS: To investigate whether intensive lifestyle intervention induce partial or complete type 2 diabetes (T2D) remission.MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a secondary analysis of a randomized, assessor-blinded, single-center trial, patients with non-insulin dependent T2D (duration<10 years), were randomly assigned (2:1, stratified by sex, from April 2015 to August 2016) to a lifestyle intervention group (n=64) or a standard care group (n=34). The primary outcome was partial or complete T2D remission defined as non-diabetic glycemia with no glucose-lowering medications at the outcome assessments at both 12- and 24-months from baseline. All participants received standard care with a standardized, blinded, target-driven medical therapy during the initial 12-months. The lifestyle intervention moreover included 5-6 weekly aerobic and combined aerobic and strength training sessions (30-60 min) and individual dietary plans aiming for BMI ≤ 25 kg/m2 . No intervention was provided during the 12 months follow-up period.RESULTS: Among 98 randomized participants, 93 (mean [SD] age, 54.6 [8.9] years; 46 [43%] women; mean [SD] baseline HbA1c 49.3 [9.3] mmol/mol) completed follow-up. At follow-up, 23%(14) in the intervention and 7%(2) in the standard care group met the criteria for any T2D remission (odds ratio (OR) [95% CI] 4.4 [0.8 to 21.4], p=0.08). Assuming participants lost-to-follow-up (N=5) had relapsed, the OR [95% CI] for T2D remission was 4.4 [1.0 to 19.8] (p=0.048).CONCLUSIONS: The statistically non-significant three-fold increased remission rate of T2D in the lifestyle intervention group calls for further large-scale studies to understand how to implement sustainable lifestyle interventions in T2D.STUDY REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov registration (NCT02417012). This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

U2 - 10.1111/dom.13802

DO - 10.1111/dom.13802

M3 - Journal article

VL - 21

SP - 2257

EP - 2266

JO - Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

JF - Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism

SN - 1462-8902

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 57340827