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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Tumor-induced escape mechanisms and their association with resistance to checkpoint inhibitor therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

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  • Michael Friedrich
  • Simon Jasinski-Bergner
  • Maria-Filothei Lazaridou
  • Karthikeyan Subbarayan
  • Chiara Massa
  • Sandy Tretbar
  • Anja Mueller
  • Diana Handke
  • Katharina Biehl
  • Jürgen Bukur
  • Marco Donia
  • Ofer Mandelboim
  • Barbara Seliger
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Immunotherapy aims to activate the immune system to fight cancer in a very specific and targeted manner. Despite the success of different immunotherapeutic strategies, in particular antibodies directed against checkpoints as well as adoptive T-cell therapy, the response of patients is limited in different types of cancers. This attributes to escape of the tumor from immune surveillance and development of acquired resistances during therapy. In this review, the different evasion and resistance mechanisms that limit the efficacy of immunotherapies targeting tumor-associated antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex molecules on the surface of the malignant cells are summarized. Overcoming these escape mechanisms is a great challenge, but might lead to a better clinical outcome of patients and is therefore currently a major focus of research.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCancer immunology, immunotherapy : CII
ISSN0340-7004
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Aug 2019

ID: 57730672