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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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Triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease: a study of 125 727 individuals

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BACKGROUND: Risk factors for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease such as smoking, hypertension, physical inactivity, and diabetes have also been associated with risk of dementia. Whether hypertriglyceridemia represents a shared risk factor as well remains unknown. We tested the hypothesis that hypertriglyceridemia is associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke.

METHODS: Using the Copenhagen General Population Study and the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we examined the association between increased plasma triglycerides and risk of non-Alzheimer dementia, Alzheimer disease, and ischemic stroke with Cox regression.

RESULTS: On a continuous scale, higher concentrations of plasma triglycerides were associated with increased risk of non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, but not with Alzheimer disease. In age, sex, and cohort adjusted models, the highest percentile of triglycerides (median 629 mg/dL; 7.1 mmol/L) versus the 1-50th percentiles (median 89 mg/dL; 1.0 mmol/L) was associated with hazard ratios of 1.75 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.63) for non-Alzheimer dementia, 1.18 (0.73-1.91) for Alzheimer disease, and of 1.89 (1.50-2.38) for ischemic stroke. Corresponding hazard ratios were 1.62 (1.08-2.44), 1.25 (0.77-2.02), and 1.57 (1.24-1.98) in models adjusted multifactorially, and 1.79 (1.16-2.87), 1.18 (0.73-1.92), and 1.46 (1.10-1.95) in models adjusted multifactorially and additionally for apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype, respectively. Results were similar after excluding individuals who had an event within 2 years after study entry.

CONCLUSIONS: Moderate hypertriglyceridemia was associated with increased risk of both non-Alzheimer dementia and ischemic stroke, highlighting plasma triglycerides as a shared risk factor between dementia and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

Original languageEnglish
JournalClinical Chemistry
Volume67
Issue number1
Pages (from-to)245-255
Number of pages11
ISSN0009-9147
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jan 2021

ID: 61718073