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Treatment of longstanding groin pain: a systematic review

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@article{b9604d8912bc49698b96549863f75de5,
title = "Treatment of longstanding groin pain: a systematic review",
abstract = "PURPOSE: The most effective treatment for longstanding groin pain with no hernia present has not been designated. The aim of this systematic review was to assess whether surgical or conservative treatment are the most effective in reducing pain and thereby returning patients to habitual activity.METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were searched. We included adults diagnosed with longstanding groin pain with no hernia. Treatment included inguinal hernia repair, tenotomy, and nonsurgical management. Outcomes included return to habitual activity, pain, patient satisfaction, re-operations for the operated patients, and shift to surgery for the non-operated patients. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies with more than 10 participants.RESULTS: In total, 72 studies with 3629 patients were included. Only five studies used a comparison group. After inguinal hernia repair, 94{\%} returned to habitual activity after median 10 weeks, 92{\%} became pain free, and 92{\%} were satisfied with their treatment. After adductor tenotomy, 90{\%} returned to habitual activity after median 12 weeks, 90{\%} became pain free, and 84{\%} were satisfied. After combined inguinal hernia repair and adductor tenotomy, 97{\%} returned to habitual activity after median 10 weeks, 92{\%} became pain free, and 91{\%} were satisfied with their treatment. After nonsurgical management, 80{\%} returned to habitual activity after median 12 weeks, 67{\%} became pain free, 56{\%} were satisfied, and 21{\%} shifted to surgery.CONCLUSION: We found that surgery seems to be more efficient in return the patients to habitual activity, reduce their pain, and satisfy them than conservative treatment.",
author = "J{\o}rgensen, {S G} and S {\"O}berg and J Rosenberg",
year = "2019",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1007/s10029-019-01919-7",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "1035--1044",
journal = "Hernia",
issn = "1265-4906",
publisher = "Springer France",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Treatment of longstanding groin pain

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Jørgensen, S G

AU - Öberg, S

AU - Rosenberg, J

PY - 2019/12

Y1 - 2019/12

N2 - PURPOSE: The most effective treatment for longstanding groin pain with no hernia present has not been designated. The aim of this systematic review was to assess whether surgical or conservative treatment are the most effective in reducing pain and thereby returning patients to habitual activity.METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were searched. We included adults diagnosed with longstanding groin pain with no hernia. Treatment included inguinal hernia repair, tenotomy, and nonsurgical management. Outcomes included return to habitual activity, pain, patient satisfaction, re-operations for the operated patients, and shift to surgery for the non-operated patients. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies with more than 10 participants.RESULTS: In total, 72 studies with 3629 patients were included. Only five studies used a comparison group. After inguinal hernia repair, 94% returned to habitual activity after median 10 weeks, 92% became pain free, and 92% were satisfied with their treatment. After adductor tenotomy, 90% returned to habitual activity after median 12 weeks, 90% became pain free, and 84% were satisfied. After combined inguinal hernia repair and adductor tenotomy, 97% returned to habitual activity after median 10 weeks, 92% became pain free, and 91% were satisfied with their treatment. After nonsurgical management, 80% returned to habitual activity after median 12 weeks, 67% became pain free, 56% were satisfied, and 21% shifted to surgery.CONCLUSION: We found that surgery seems to be more efficient in return the patients to habitual activity, reduce their pain, and satisfy them than conservative treatment.

AB - PURPOSE: The most effective treatment for longstanding groin pain with no hernia present has not been designated. The aim of this systematic review was to assess whether surgical or conservative treatment are the most effective in reducing pain and thereby returning patients to habitual activity.METHODS: PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane were searched. We included adults diagnosed with longstanding groin pain with no hernia. Treatment included inguinal hernia repair, tenotomy, and nonsurgical management. Outcomes included return to habitual activity, pain, patient satisfaction, re-operations for the operated patients, and shift to surgery for the non-operated patients. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies with more than 10 participants.RESULTS: In total, 72 studies with 3629 patients were included. Only five studies used a comparison group. After inguinal hernia repair, 94% returned to habitual activity after median 10 weeks, 92% became pain free, and 92% were satisfied with their treatment. After adductor tenotomy, 90% returned to habitual activity after median 12 weeks, 90% became pain free, and 84% were satisfied. After combined inguinal hernia repair and adductor tenotomy, 97% returned to habitual activity after median 10 weeks, 92% became pain free, and 91% were satisfied with their treatment. After nonsurgical management, 80% returned to habitual activity after median 12 weeks, 67% became pain free, 56% were satisfied, and 21% shifted to surgery.CONCLUSION: We found that surgery seems to be more efficient in return the patients to habitual activity, reduce their pain, and satisfy them than conservative treatment.

U2 - 10.1007/s10029-019-01919-7

DO - 10.1007/s10029-019-01919-7

M3 - Review

VL - 23

SP - 1035

EP - 1044

JO - Hernia

JF - Hernia

SN - 1265-4906

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 58972489