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Treatment of adult atopic dermatitis patients according to disease characteristics and demographics

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@article{4c4c91a151aa4d41b9b0500657b06a91,
title = "Treatment of adult atopic dermatitis patients according to disease characteristics and demographics",
abstract = "Little is currently known about possible associations between disease specific characteristics of atopic dermatitis (AD) and use of medical treatments. We explored the use of AD treatments within the past 12 months in Danish adults according to distinct patient characteristics. Patients who had received a diagnosis of AD in a hospital in- or outpatient setting as adults were surveyed and data cross-linked to a national prescription registry. AD severity was measured by the Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD). A total of 3834 patients participated. Use of topical medication in the past 12 months increased with increasing AD severity, whereas no difference was observed for systemic medication use. Positive associations between AD in the face and neck, and use of mild and moderately potent topical corticosteroids were observed, while involvement of palms and chest was associated with use of more potent topical corticosteroids. The mean DLQI, skin pain, and itch severity scores were lower in patients managed only with topical corticosteroids (5.5, 3.2, and 4.3, respectively) compared to patients treated with both oral and topical medication (7.1, 3.8, and 5.0, respectively). Patients with frequent topical corticosteroid use tended to be older (50.7 vs 48.6 years), males (50.0% vs 33.6%), current daily smokers (17.3% vs 13.7%), and having asthma (59.1% vs 43.8%) compared with infrequent users of topical corticosteroids. We found a disconnect between the severity of AD signs and symptoms, and use of AD therapies. In particular, a very modest use of systemic immunosuppressants was seen even among patients with severe AD symptoms. However, the underlying clinical decisions and reasons behind this disconnect is not clear based on the current data.",
keywords = "atopic dermatitis, epidemiology, treatment",
author = "Thyssen, {Jacob P} and Andersen, {Yuki M F} and Ida Vittrup and Evangeline Pierce and Amy DeLozier and Alexander Egeberg",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC.",
year = "2020",
month = nov,
doi = "10.1111/dth.14439",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "e14439",
journal = "Dermatologic Therapy",
issn = "1396-0296",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing, Inc",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Treatment of adult atopic dermatitis patients according to disease characteristics and demographics

AU - Thyssen, Jacob P

AU - Andersen, Yuki M F

AU - Vittrup, Ida

AU - Pierce, Evangeline

AU - DeLozier, Amy

AU - Egeberg, Alexander

N1 - © 2020 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

PY - 2020/11

Y1 - 2020/11

N2 - Little is currently known about possible associations between disease specific characteristics of atopic dermatitis (AD) and use of medical treatments. We explored the use of AD treatments within the past 12 months in Danish adults according to distinct patient characteristics. Patients who had received a diagnosis of AD in a hospital in- or outpatient setting as adults were surveyed and data cross-linked to a national prescription registry. AD severity was measured by the Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD). A total of 3834 patients participated. Use of topical medication in the past 12 months increased with increasing AD severity, whereas no difference was observed for systemic medication use. Positive associations between AD in the face and neck, and use of mild and moderately potent topical corticosteroids were observed, while involvement of palms and chest was associated with use of more potent topical corticosteroids. The mean DLQI, skin pain, and itch severity scores were lower in patients managed only with topical corticosteroids (5.5, 3.2, and 4.3, respectively) compared to patients treated with both oral and topical medication (7.1, 3.8, and 5.0, respectively). Patients with frequent topical corticosteroid use tended to be older (50.7 vs 48.6 years), males (50.0% vs 33.6%), current daily smokers (17.3% vs 13.7%), and having asthma (59.1% vs 43.8%) compared with infrequent users of topical corticosteroids. We found a disconnect between the severity of AD signs and symptoms, and use of AD therapies. In particular, a very modest use of systemic immunosuppressants was seen even among patients with severe AD symptoms. However, the underlying clinical decisions and reasons behind this disconnect is not clear based on the current data.

AB - Little is currently known about possible associations between disease specific characteristics of atopic dermatitis (AD) and use of medical treatments. We explored the use of AD treatments within the past 12 months in Danish adults according to distinct patient characteristics. Patients who had received a diagnosis of AD in a hospital in- or outpatient setting as adults were surveyed and data cross-linked to a national prescription registry. AD severity was measured by the Patient-Oriented SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (PO-SCORAD). A total of 3834 patients participated. Use of topical medication in the past 12 months increased with increasing AD severity, whereas no difference was observed for systemic medication use. Positive associations between AD in the face and neck, and use of mild and moderately potent topical corticosteroids were observed, while involvement of palms and chest was associated with use of more potent topical corticosteroids. The mean DLQI, skin pain, and itch severity scores were lower in patients managed only with topical corticosteroids (5.5, 3.2, and 4.3, respectively) compared to patients treated with both oral and topical medication (7.1, 3.8, and 5.0, respectively). Patients with frequent topical corticosteroid use tended to be older (50.7 vs 48.6 years), males (50.0% vs 33.6%), current daily smokers (17.3% vs 13.7%), and having asthma (59.1% vs 43.8%) compared with infrequent users of topical corticosteroids. We found a disconnect between the severity of AD signs and symptoms, and use of AD therapies. In particular, a very modest use of systemic immunosuppressants was seen even among patients with severe AD symptoms. However, the underlying clinical decisions and reasons behind this disconnect is not clear based on the current data.

KW - atopic dermatitis

KW - epidemiology

KW - treatment

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85096688909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/dth.14439

DO - 10.1111/dth.14439

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 33084105

VL - 33

SP - e14439

JO - Dermatologic Therapy

JF - Dermatologic Therapy

SN - 1396-0296

IS - 6

M1 - e14439

ER -

ID: 61783046