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Trait aggression and trait impulsivity are not related to frontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor binding in healthy individuals

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Numerous studies indicate that the serotonergic (5-HT) transmitter system is involved in the regulation of impulsive aggression and there is from post-mortem, in vivo imaging and genetic studies evidence that the 5-HT2A receptor may be involved. We investigated 94 healthy individuals (60 men, mean age 47.0±18.7, range 23-86) to determine if trait aggression and trait impulsivity were related to frontal cortex 5-HT2A receptor binding (5-HT2AR) as measured with [18F]-altanserin PET imaging. Trait aggression and trait impulsivity were assessed with the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale 11 (BIS-11). Statistical analyses were conducted using a multiple linear regression model and internal consistency reliability of the AQ and BIS-11 was evaluated by Cronbach's alpha. Contrary to our hypothesis, results revealed no significant associations between 5-HT2AR and the AQ or BIS-11 total scores. Also, there was no significant interaction between gender and frontal cortex 5-HT2AR in predicting trait aggression and trait impulsivity. This is the first study to examine how 5-HT2AR relates to trait aggression and trait impulsivity in a large sample of healthy individuals. Our findings are not supportive of a selective role for 5-HT2AR in mediating the 5-HT related effects on aggression and impulsivity in psychiatrically healthy individuals.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume212
Issue number2
Pages (from-to)125-31
Number of pages7
ISSN0165-1781
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 May 2013

    Research areas

  • Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Aggression, Female, Fluorodeoxyglucose F18, Frontal Lobe, Hormones, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Ketanserin, Male, Middle Aged, Personality, Personality Inventory, Positron-Emission Tomography, Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2A, Serotonin Antagonists, Statistics, Nonparametric, Young Adult

ID: 42576191