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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
E-pub ahead of print

Thiamine-Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia-Related Diabetes: Long-Term Clinical Outcomes in 23 Pediatric Patients From the DPV and SWEET Registries

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  • SWEET and DPV Study Groups
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OBJECTIVES: To describe clinical presentation and long-term outcomes in a large cohort of children diagnosed with thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia (TRMA)-related diabetes.

METHODS: Data from the Diabetes Patienten Verlaufsdokumentation (DPV) and Better control in Pediatric and Adolescent diabeteS: Working to crEate CEnTers of Reference (SWEET) registries were used to identify cases. Complementary information was collected through a chart review of each case. Descriptive analyses with medians and interquartile ranges and numbers (proportions) were tabulated.

RESULTS: We identified 23 cases (52% male) in the 2 registries. Eighteen (78%) had genetic confirmation of TRMA. Median age at diabetes onset was 1.4 (quartiles 0.8 to 3.6) years and median age at initiation of thiamine treatment was 5.9 (2.4 to 12.4) years. At their most recent visit, patients' median age was 14.3 (8.1 to 17.5) years, glycated hemoglobin level was 6.9% (6.1% to 7.9%), insulin dose was 0.9 (0.4 to 1.2) units/kg per day and thiamine dose was 200 (100 to 300) mg/day. Three patients were not treated with insulin or antidiabetic drugs. There was no difference in diabetes outcomes in patients with initiation of thiamine ≤1 year after diabetes onset compared to patients with initiation of thiamine >1 year after diabetes onset.

CONCLUSIONS: This is the longest case series of pediatric TRMA-related diabetes reported to date. Diabetes onset often occurs several years before initiation of thiamine supplementation. Early initiation of thiamine (within 1 year of diabetes onset) was not linked to improved diabetes outcome. However, the role of thiamine in pancreatic function needs further assessment. Patients with TRMA-related diabetes maintained good glycemic control even after 9 years (median) of follow up.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCanadian Journal of Diabetes
ISSN1499-2671
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Nov 2020

ID: 62445475