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The treatment in the Danish suicide prevention clinics: a clinician perspective

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Lahoz, Titia ; Winsløv, Jan-Henrik ; Christiansen, Rikke ; Krogh, Søren ; Knudsen, Per Bjerregaard ; Wang, August G ; Erlangsen, Annette ; Nielsen, Klaus. / The treatment in the Danish suicide prevention clinics : a clinician perspective. In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry. 2020 ; Vol. 74, No. 7. pp. 533-540.

Bibtex

@article{302404cc2fee4144854cdbb992fdda00,
title = "The treatment in the Danish suicide prevention clinics: a clinician perspective",
abstract = "Background: Few qualitative studies have focused on clinicians' perspectives regarding treatment of suicidal people. Despite limited evidence and imperfect risk-assessment tools, the psychosocial therapy at the Danish suicide prevention clinics has been linked to reductions in numbers of repeated self-harm, deaths by suicide, and other causes. This merits an investigation into how clinicians describe their practice.Methods: Using a qualitative design, 10 semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed to describe the psychosocial therapy.Results: The practices that the therapists described could be categorized along four dichotomous continuums. These illustrated dilemmas encountered during treatment of suicidal patients: 1) intuitive vs. specific risk assessment, 2) meaningful vs. formal, 3) patient-oriented vs. therapist-oriented and 4) direct vs. indirect approach to suicide prevention.Conclusions: Treatment in the Danish Suicide Prevention Clinics is characterized by methodological flexibility and diversity and with an emphasis on a patient-oriented approach. Furthermore, clinicians balance knowledge available by switching between a direct and an indirect approach according to the perceived suicide risk. If suicide risk was perceived as high, they would administer a direct approach and if low, an indirect approach. Finally, there seems to be differences as to how effective therapeutic methodologies work in the practice of suicide prevention.",
keywords = "intervention, qualitative, Suicide",
author = "Titia Lahoz and Jan-Henrik Winsl{\o}v and Rikke Christiansen and S{\o}ren Krogh and Knudsen, {Per Bjerregaard} and Wang, {August G} and Annette Erlangsen and Klaus Nielsen",
year = "2020",
month = oct,
doi = "10.1080/08039488.2020.1759683",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "533--540",
journal = "Nordic Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0803-9488",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The treatment in the Danish suicide prevention clinics

T2 - a clinician perspective

AU - Lahoz, Titia

AU - Winsløv, Jan-Henrik

AU - Christiansen, Rikke

AU - Krogh, Søren

AU - Knudsen, Per Bjerregaard

AU - Wang, August G

AU - Erlangsen, Annette

AU - Nielsen, Klaus

PY - 2020/10

Y1 - 2020/10

N2 - Background: Few qualitative studies have focused on clinicians' perspectives regarding treatment of suicidal people. Despite limited evidence and imperfect risk-assessment tools, the psychosocial therapy at the Danish suicide prevention clinics has been linked to reductions in numbers of repeated self-harm, deaths by suicide, and other causes. This merits an investigation into how clinicians describe their practice.Methods: Using a qualitative design, 10 semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed to describe the psychosocial therapy.Results: The practices that the therapists described could be categorized along four dichotomous continuums. These illustrated dilemmas encountered during treatment of suicidal patients: 1) intuitive vs. specific risk assessment, 2) meaningful vs. formal, 3) patient-oriented vs. therapist-oriented and 4) direct vs. indirect approach to suicide prevention.Conclusions: Treatment in the Danish Suicide Prevention Clinics is characterized by methodological flexibility and diversity and with an emphasis on a patient-oriented approach. Furthermore, clinicians balance knowledge available by switching between a direct and an indirect approach according to the perceived suicide risk. If suicide risk was perceived as high, they would administer a direct approach and if low, an indirect approach. Finally, there seems to be differences as to how effective therapeutic methodologies work in the practice of suicide prevention.

AB - Background: Few qualitative studies have focused on clinicians' perspectives regarding treatment of suicidal people. Despite limited evidence and imperfect risk-assessment tools, the psychosocial therapy at the Danish suicide prevention clinics has been linked to reductions in numbers of repeated self-harm, deaths by suicide, and other causes. This merits an investigation into how clinicians describe their practice.Methods: Using a qualitative design, 10 semi-structured interviews were conducted and analyzed to describe the psychosocial therapy.Results: The practices that the therapists described could be categorized along four dichotomous continuums. These illustrated dilemmas encountered during treatment of suicidal patients: 1) intuitive vs. specific risk assessment, 2) meaningful vs. formal, 3) patient-oriented vs. therapist-oriented and 4) direct vs. indirect approach to suicide prevention.Conclusions: Treatment in the Danish Suicide Prevention Clinics is characterized by methodological flexibility and diversity and with an emphasis on a patient-oriented approach. Furthermore, clinicians balance knowledge available by switching between a direct and an indirect approach according to the perceived suicide risk. If suicide risk was perceived as high, they would administer a direct approach and if low, an indirect approach. Finally, there seems to be differences as to how effective therapeutic methodologies work in the practice of suicide prevention.

KW - intervention

KW - qualitative

KW - Suicide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85084421941&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/08039488.2020.1759683

DO - 10.1080/08039488.2020.1759683

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 32379558

VL - 74

SP - 533

EP - 540

JO - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

JF - Nordic Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0803-9488

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 60328987