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The Top 5 Neurotransmitters from a Clinical Neurologist's Perspective

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  1. Citrate, a Ubiquitous Key Metabolite with Regulatory Function in the CNS

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  2. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats: a biosensor study

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  3. A matter of balance: role of neurexin and neuroligin at the synapse

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  4. Functional recovery of regenerating motor axons is delayed in mice heterozygously deficient for the myelin protein P(0) gene

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  5. Screening of Toll-like receptors expression in multiple system atrophy brains

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  1. Semiology and Mechanisms of Near-Death Experiences

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  2. Fatal kakeksi ved mitokondriel neurogastrointestinal encefalomyopati.

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  3. Susacs syndrom er en vigtig differentialdiagnose ved monosymptomatisk encefalopati hos yngre voksne.

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  4. Neuromuscular adverse events associated with anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies: Systematic review

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Neurologists are proficient in neuroanatomy and -physiology but their understanding of neurochemistry tends to be mediocre. As a rule, we do not think in biochemical pathways and complex metabolic interactions but rather associate a few neurotransmitters with well-known brain diseases or drugs that we routinely prescribe. Most of us can hardly come up with more than a handful of relevant neurochemicals. From our point of view the most important neurotransmitters are, in alphabetical order, acetylcholine (associated with Alzheimer's disease and myasthenia gravis), dopamine (Parkinson's disease), glutamate and GABA (epilepsy and seizures), and serotonin (major depression; although this is arguably the domain of psychiatrists). In this commentary, the author presents the knowledge derived from neurochemistry research that has proven useful for clinical neurological practice. In addition, he explains what biochemists, basic neuroscientists and other non-neurologists need to consider in the encounter with a clinical neurologist.

Original languageEnglish
JournalNeurochemical Research
Volume42
Issue number6
Pages (from-to)1767-1771
ISSN0364-3190
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

ID: 49883625