Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

The spectrum of antidiabetic actions of GLP-1 in patients with diabetes

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. A short history of neuroendocrine tumours and their peptide hormones

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Assessing health-related quality of life in patients with benign non-toxic goitre

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

  3. Genetic and non-iodine-related factors in the aetiology of nodular goitre

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. The metabolic syndrome in HIV

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Endocrine disorders in pregnancy: physiological and hormonal aspects of pregnancy

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor regulation of basal dopamine transporter activity is species-dependent

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Pregnancy loss is associated with type 2 diabetes: a nationwide case-control study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Glucagon Resistance at the Level of Amino Acid Turnover in Obese Subjects with Hepatic Steatosis

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations
This article focusses on the antidiabetic therapeutic potential of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) in the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). T2DM is characterised by insulin resistance, impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion and inappropriately regulated glucagon secretion, which in combination eventually result in hyperglycaemia and, in the longer term, microvascular and macrovascular diabetic complications. Traditional treatment modalities - even multidrug approaches - for T2DM are often unsatisfactory in making patients reach glycaemic goals as the disease progresses caused by a steady, relentless decline in pancreatic beta-cell function. Furthermore, current treatment modalities are often limited by inconvenient dosing regimens and safety and tolerability issues, the latter including hypoglycaemia, body weight gain, oedema and gastrointestinal side effects. Therefore, the actions of GLP-1, which include the potentation of meal-induced insulin secretion and trophic effects on the beta-cell, have attracted a lot of interest. GLP-1 also inhibits glucagon secretion and suppresses food intake and appetite.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBest Practice & Research: Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism
Volume23
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)453-62
Number of pages10
ISSN1521-690X
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2009

ID: 32266457