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The Role of Psychological Stress Reactions in the Longitudinal Relation Between Workplace Bullying and Turnover

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Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten ; Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard ; Conway, Paul Maurice ; Clausen, Thomas ; Bonde, Jens Peter ; Garde, Anne Helene ; Hogh, Annie ; Kaerlev, Linda ; Török, Eszter ; Hansen, Åse Marie. / The Role of Psychological Stress Reactions in the Longitudinal Relation Between Workplace Bullying and Turnover. In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 59, No. 7. pp. 665-672.

Bibtex

@article{a9bafbc30bc24528bc30007a61cc828d,
title = "The Role of Psychological Stress Reactions in the Longitudinal Relation Between Workplace Bullying and Turnover",
abstract = "OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between workplace bullying and change of job/unemployment, and to investigate whether psychological stress reactions constitute a potential pathway linking workplace bullying and change of job/unemployment.METHODS: We used questionnaire data on workplace bullying and psychological stress reactions and register data on change of job/unemployment. We applied a multiple pathway approach to estimate the proportion of the association between workplace bullying and subsequent change of job/unemployment that was potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions.RESULTS: Workplace bullying was associated with risk of change of job (odds ratio [OR] = 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.72; 24% potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions) and unemployment (OR = 4.90; 95% CI: 3.18-7.55; 19% potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions).CONCLUSION: Workplace bullying has important consequences for labor market outcomes. Psychological stress reactions may play a vital role in this process.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Kirsten Nabe-Nielsen and Grynderup, {Matias Br{\o}dsgaard} and Conway, {Paul Maurice} and Thomas Clausen and Bonde, {Jens Peter} and Garde, {Anne Helene} and Annie Hogh and Linda Kaerlev and Eszter T{\"o}r{\"o}k and Hansen, {{\AA}se Marie}",
year = "2017",
month = jul,
doi = "10.1097/JOM.0000000000001050",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "665--672",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams & Wilkins",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Role of Psychological Stress Reactions in the Longitudinal Relation Between Workplace Bullying and Turnover

AU - Nabe-Nielsen, Kirsten

AU - Grynderup, Matias Brødsgaard

AU - Conway, Paul Maurice

AU - Clausen, Thomas

AU - Bonde, Jens Peter

AU - Garde, Anne Helene

AU - Hogh, Annie

AU - Kaerlev, Linda

AU - Török, Eszter

AU - Hansen, Åse Marie

PY - 2017/7

Y1 - 2017/7

N2 - OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between workplace bullying and change of job/unemployment, and to investigate whether psychological stress reactions constitute a potential pathway linking workplace bullying and change of job/unemployment.METHODS: We used questionnaire data on workplace bullying and psychological stress reactions and register data on change of job/unemployment. We applied a multiple pathway approach to estimate the proportion of the association between workplace bullying and subsequent change of job/unemployment that was potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions.RESULTS: Workplace bullying was associated with risk of change of job (odds ratio [OR] = 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.72; 24% potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions) and unemployment (OR = 4.90; 95% CI: 3.18-7.55; 19% potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions).CONCLUSION: Workplace bullying has important consequences for labor market outcomes. Psychological stress reactions may play a vital role in this process.

AB - OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between workplace bullying and change of job/unemployment, and to investigate whether psychological stress reactions constitute a potential pathway linking workplace bullying and change of job/unemployment.METHODS: We used questionnaire data on workplace bullying and psychological stress reactions and register data on change of job/unemployment. We applied a multiple pathway approach to estimate the proportion of the association between workplace bullying and subsequent change of job/unemployment that was potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions.RESULTS: Workplace bullying was associated with risk of change of job (odds ratio [OR] = 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-1.72; 24% potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions) and unemployment (OR = 4.90; 95% CI: 3.18-7.55; 19% potentially mediated by psychological stress reactions).CONCLUSION: Workplace bullying has important consequences for labor market outcomes. Psychological stress reactions may play a vital role in this process.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001050

DO - 10.1097/JOM.0000000000001050

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 28692000

VL - 59

SP - 665

EP - 672

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 52554968