Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes: A scoping review

Research output: Contribution to journalReviewpeer-review

Harvard

Johansen, CB, Rothmann, MJ, Andersen, A, Beck-Nielsen, H & Pouwer, F 2020, 'The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes: A scoping review', Pediatric Diabetes, vol. 21, no. 6, pp. 995-1030. https://doi.org/10.1111/pedi.13022

APA

Johansen, C. B., Rothmann, M. J., Andersen, A., Beck-Nielsen, H., & Pouwer, F. (2020). The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes: A scoping review. Pediatric Diabetes, 21(6), 995-1030. https://doi.org/10.1111/pedi.13022

CBE

MLA

Vancouver

Johansen CB, Rothmann MJ, Andersen A, Beck-Nielsen H, Pouwer F. The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes: A scoping review. Pediatric Diabetes. 2020 Sep;21(6):995-1030. https://doi.org/10.1111/pedi.13022

Author

Johansen, Clea Bruun ; Rothmann, Mette Juel ; Andersen, Anette ; Beck-Nielsen, Henning ; Pouwer, Frans. / The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes : A scoping review. In: Pediatric Diabetes. 2020 ; Vol. 21, No. 6. pp. 995-1030.

Bibtex

@article{34abfd2ceb1d429cbb8765a0ff7afc3b,
title = "The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes: A scoping review",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes often have poor diabetes self-care and pose a considerable therapeutic challenge. They simultaneously handle a life phase characterized by instability, identity exploration, and transitions and manage a chronic illness that demands structure, self-discipline, and repeated health care contacts. Relation to parents is often ambivalent but typically remains the most stable social support, so parental support could potentially be helpful for diabetes self-care and wellbeing.METHOD: This scoping review aimed to identify, summarize and analyze empirical studies (for instance interview studies, questionnaire studies and intervention studies) exploring parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Studies were identified in PsycInfo, PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Data were extracted by one author and checked by another. Study results were synthesized by a convergent mixed methods approach and qualitative thematic analysis.RESULTS: We included 26 studies (2829 participants), 16 interview studies, 10 questionnaire studies, and no intervention studies. Five overarching themes were identified: self-care and glycemic control, diabetes-related emotional wellbeing, support characteristics, ambivalence and harms, and core support providers. Parents tended to contribute positively to diabetes self-care, glycemic control, and psychological wellbeing. However, emerging adults did not want to be too dependent on their parents and family, and family could also act unsupportively; when absent, disinterested in diabetes or controlling.CONCLUSION: This review underlines that parental support still plays a role for diabetes self-care and wellbeing in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Age-appropriate parental support therefore seems a promising path to investigate further.",
author = "Johansen, {Clea Bruun} and Rothmann, {Mette Juel} and Anette Andersen and Henning Beck-Nielsen and Frans Pouwer",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2020",
month = sep,
doi = "10.1111/pedi.13022",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "995--1030",
journal = "Pediatric Diabetes",
issn = "1399-543X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes

T2 - A scoping review

AU - Johansen, Clea Bruun

AU - Rothmann, Mette Juel

AU - Andersen, Anette

AU - Beck-Nielsen, Henning

AU - Pouwer, Frans

N1 - © 2020 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2020/9

Y1 - 2020/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes often have poor diabetes self-care and pose a considerable therapeutic challenge. They simultaneously handle a life phase characterized by instability, identity exploration, and transitions and manage a chronic illness that demands structure, self-discipline, and repeated health care contacts. Relation to parents is often ambivalent but typically remains the most stable social support, so parental support could potentially be helpful for diabetes self-care and wellbeing.METHOD: This scoping review aimed to identify, summarize and analyze empirical studies (for instance interview studies, questionnaire studies and intervention studies) exploring parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Studies were identified in PsycInfo, PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Data were extracted by one author and checked by another. Study results were synthesized by a convergent mixed methods approach and qualitative thematic analysis.RESULTS: We included 26 studies (2829 participants), 16 interview studies, 10 questionnaire studies, and no intervention studies. Five overarching themes were identified: self-care and glycemic control, diabetes-related emotional wellbeing, support characteristics, ambivalence and harms, and core support providers. Parents tended to contribute positively to diabetes self-care, glycemic control, and psychological wellbeing. However, emerging adults did not want to be too dependent on their parents and family, and family could also act unsupportively; when absent, disinterested in diabetes or controlling.CONCLUSION: This review underlines that parental support still plays a role for diabetes self-care and wellbeing in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Age-appropriate parental support therefore seems a promising path to investigate further.

AB - BACKGROUND: Emerging adults with type 1 diabetes often have poor diabetes self-care and pose a considerable therapeutic challenge. They simultaneously handle a life phase characterized by instability, identity exploration, and transitions and manage a chronic illness that demands structure, self-discipline, and repeated health care contacts. Relation to parents is often ambivalent but typically remains the most stable social support, so parental support could potentially be helpful for diabetes self-care and wellbeing.METHOD: This scoping review aimed to identify, summarize and analyze empirical studies (for instance interview studies, questionnaire studies and intervention studies) exploring parental support for emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Studies were identified in PsycInfo, PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Data were extracted by one author and checked by another. Study results were synthesized by a convergent mixed methods approach and qualitative thematic analysis.RESULTS: We included 26 studies (2829 participants), 16 interview studies, 10 questionnaire studies, and no intervention studies. Five overarching themes were identified: self-care and glycemic control, diabetes-related emotional wellbeing, support characteristics, ambivalence and harms, and core support providers. Parents tended to contribute positively to diabetes self-care, glycemic control, and psychological wellbeing. However, emerging adults did not want to be too dependent on their parents and family, and family could also act unsupportively; when absent, disinterested in diabetes or controlling.CONCLUSION: This review underlines that parental support still plays a role for diabetes self-care and wellbeing in emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. Age-appropriate parental support therefore seems a promising path to investigate further.

U2 - 10.1111/pedi.13022

DO - 10.1111/pedi.13022

M3 - Review

C2 - 32301182

VL - 21

SP - 995

EP - 1030

JO - Pediatric Diabetes

JF - Pediatric Diabetes

SN - 1399-543X

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 61380921