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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of glaucoma

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Glaucoma is an ocular disorder characterized by the progressive loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and their axons. There are various hypotheses concerning the cause of RGC death. Previously, glaucoma was defined by high intraocular pressure (IOP); during the past decade, however, glaucoma specialists have acknowledged that elevated IOP is the most important risk factor for glaucoma, but does not define the disease. Other factors such as genetics, blood flow, and excitotoxicity are suggested as potential causal factors for progressive RGC death observed in glaucoma. We review recent studies elucidating a possible role of low-grade inflammation as a causal factor in the pathogenesis of glaucoma.
Original languageEnglish
JournalSurvey of Ophthalmology
Volume58
Issue number4
Pages (from-to)311-20
Number of pages10
ISSN0039-6257
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Research areas

  • Animals, Anoxia, Axons, Cell Death, Glaucoma, Humans, Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, Retinal Ganglion Cells

ID: 42187286