Research
Print page Print page
Switch language
The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
Published

The relationship between sensory loss and persistent pain 1 year after breast cancer surgery

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Modulation of Itch by Conditioning Itch and Pain Stimulation in Healthy Humans

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. The ACTTION-APS-AAPM Pain Taxonomy (AAAPT) Multidimensional Approach to Classifying Acute Pain Conditions

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Conditioned Pain Modulation and Pressure Pain Sensitivity in the Adult Danish General Population: The DanFunD Study

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Situational but Not Dispositional Pain Catastrophizing Correlates With Early Postoperative Pain in Pain-Free Patients Before Surgery

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  1. Dexamethasone Dose and Early Postoperative Recovery after Mastectomy: A Double-blind, Randomized Trial

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Alvimopan and outcome after colectomy?

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetterResearchpeer-review

  3. Challenges in optimising recovery after emergency laparotomy

    Research output: Contribution to journalReviewResearchpeer-review

View graph of relations

Moderate-to-severe persistent pain after breast cancer surgery (PPBCS) affects 10-20% of the patients. Sensory dysfunction is often concomitantly present suggesting a neuropathic pain state. The relationship between various postoperative pain states and sensory dysfunction has been examined by quantitative sensory testing (QST), but only 2 smaller studies have examined PPBCS and sensory dysfunction in the surgical area. The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the relative importance of sensory function and PPBCS. QST consisted of sensory mapping, tactile detection threshold (TDT), mechanical pain threshold (MPT) and thermal thresholds. 290 patients were enrolled and results showed that 38 (13 %) had moderate-to-severe pain and 246 (85%) had hypoesthesia in the surgical area 1 year after surgery. Increased hypoesthesia areas were associated with both pain at rest and during movement (p=0.0001). Pain during movement was associated to a side-to-side difference of 140% (p=0.001) for TDT and 40% (p=0.01) for MPT as well as increased thermal thresholds in the axilla (p˃0.001). Logistic regression models controlling for confounders demonstrated larger areas of hypoesthesia as a significant risk factor, OR 1.85 per 100 cm2 for pain at rest and OR 1.36 per 100 cm2 for pain during movement.

Original languageEnglish
JournalThe journal of pain : official journal of the American Pain Society
Volume18
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)1129-1138
Number of pages10
ISSN1526-5900
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2017

    Research areas

  • Journal Article

ID: 50558988