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The Capital Region of Denmark - a part of Copenhagen University Hospital
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The NTS-DBL2X region of VAR2CSA induces cross-reactive antibodies that inhibit adhesion of several plasmodium falciparum isolates to chondroitin sulfate A

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  • Pascal Bigey
  • Sédami Gnidehou
  • Justin Doritchamou
  • Mickael Quiviger
  • Firmine Viwami
  • Aude Couturier
  • Ali Salanti
  • Morten A Nielsen
  • Daniel Scherman
  • Philippe Deloron
  • Nicaise Tuikue Ndam
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Binding to chondroitin sulfate A by VAR2CSA, a parasite protein expressed on infected erythrocytes, allows placental sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. This leads to severe consequences such as maternal anemia, stillbirths, and intrauterine growth retardation. The latter has been clearly associated to increased morbidity and mortality of the infants. Acquired anti-VAR2CSA antibodies have been associated with improved pregnancy outcomes, suggesting a vaccine could prevent the syndrome. However, identifying functionally important regions in the large VAR2CSA protein is difficult.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume204
Issue number7
Pages (from-to)1125-33
Number of pages9
ISSN0022-1899
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2011

ID: 32768916